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What the Hell Happened to Michael Keaton?

Michael Keaton

Michael Keaton

Michael Keaton started out as a manic comic and grew into an unlikely leading man and an even more unlikely super hero.  As the first big-screen Batman, Keaton was able to make deals that secured him A-list work.  But when he walked away from the Bat-franchise, Keaton’s opportunities dried up.  Eventually, he all but disappeared from the spotlight.

What the hell happened?

Michael Keaton – Mr. Roger’s Neighborhood - 1968

Michael Keaton – Mr. Roger’s Neighborhood – 1975

After failing to break into stand-up comedy, Michael Keaton worked as a cameraman at a public television station in Pittsburg.  He started appearing onscreen in TV shows like Where the Heart Is and Mr. Roger’s Neighborhood where he played one of the Flying Zucchini Brothers.  Keaton was a production assistant on Mr. Rogers and hosted a tribute show on PBS following Fred Rogers’ death in 2004.

I kind of blew past that stand-up comedy career, didn’t I?  Wanna see a clip?  Of course you do.  Here’s an early Michael Keaton stand-up routine.

Keaton left public television to start a career as an actor.  He appeared on TV shows like Maude and The Mary Tyler Moore Hour.  Here’s a clip of Keaton doing a song and dance number with a pre-fame David Letterman and Mary Tyler Moore.

Man, I do not miss variety shows.  But that was pretty awesome.

As Keaton was entering this phase of his career, he was asked to change his professional name.  Keaton’s real name is Michael Douglas.  In fact, it is still his legal name.  But there was already a famous actor named Michael Douglas and Mike Douglas was a famous TV host.

Ironically, Michael Douglas’ father, Kirk Douglas, was born Issur Danielovitch.  If he hadn’t changed his name to Douglas when he came to Hollywood, the name Michael Douglas would have been available for Keaton to use.  If that had happened, Michael Douglas would have been Michael Danielovitch and Michael Keaton would have been Michael Douglas.

The internet insists that Keaton chose his stage name after reading an article about Diane Keaton on a plane.  However, this is not true.  It’s funny how the internet feeds off of itself some times.  Someone posted the original story without citation and soon it became cited all over the place including Wikipedia.  But Keaton has publicly denied the story.  Keaton picked the name without giving it much thought.  But he has said Buster Keaton was an influence.

rabbit test

In 1978, Keaton had a cameo role in his first movie, Rabbit Test.  Rabbit Test starred Billy Crystal as the world’s first pregnant man.  There was nowhere to go from here but up.

keaton working stiffs

Michael Keaton – Working Stiffs – 1979

In 1979, Keaton starred opposite Jim Belushi in the short-lived sitcom, Working Stiffs.  Keaton and Belushi played brothers who lived together and worked as janitors.  Nine episodes of the show were produced, but only four episodes were aired.

I’m not sure which is worse.  A pregnant-man film directed by Joan Rivers or a sit-com co-starring the lesser Belushi.  Fortunately for Keaton, one of the writer’s on Working Stiffs was also working on a screenplay for Ron Howard and introduced them.

Michael Keaton - Night Shift - 1982

Michael Keaton – Night Shift – 1982

That screenplay was Night Shift.

Night Shift was released in 1982 and starred Henry Winkler as an accountant-turned-pimp  and a pre-Cheers Shelley Long as a hooker with a heart of gold (a novel concept if ever there was one).  Ron Howard directed his former Happy Days co-star in what was intended to be a career change for both of them.  Howard was a novice director and Winkler was trying to get away from his Fonzie persona.

Keaton absolutely stole the show.  His motormouth idea man, Billy “Blaze” Blazejowski never stopped rattling off one crazy idea after another to the point where even the Fonz lost his cool and told him to shut up.

But Keaton’s over-the-top performance made the studio nervous.  According to Keaton,

“They saw the dailies and they were telling Ronnie I had to stop chewing gum, I had to get my hair cut. Eventually they were, like, ‘We have to fire him! What the fuck is he doing?’ They didn’t get it. To Ronnie’s credit, he told ’em to wait and see until it was all cut together.”

Night Shift got mostly favorable reviews and performed reasonably well at the box office.  It set off a string of prostitution-themed comedies in the 80’s that included Risky Business and Doctor Detroit.

Keaton - mr mom

Michael Keaton – Mr. Mom – 1983

Following Night Shift, Keaton was offered the John Candy role in Ron Howard’s Splash.  But he turned it down fearing that the role was too similar to the side-kick he played in Night Shift.

Instead, Keaton opted for a starring role in Mr. Mom in 1983.  John Hughes’ script for the high concept domestic comedy appealed to Keaton as did the fact it allowed him to grow as a leading man.

Reviews at the time were mixed to positive.  Many noted that the film felt a little like a TV sitcom.  But Keaton elevated the material.  Mr. Mom was a hit at the box office.

Next: Johnny Dangerously and Gung Ho

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Posted on March 16, 2011, in Movies, What the Hell Happened?, WTHH Actor and tagged , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 703 Comments.

  1. Iam wondering was mike keaton batman co star jack nicholson ever consider a sex symbol for his physical appearance. sex symbol in the same way say pitt was

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    • Not in the same way as Brad Pitt, but I think in a more complex, personality-driven kind of way. Brad Pitt could’ve had the flavor of UPS cardboard and he still would’ve had his fawners; fortunately that wasn’t the case.

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  2. Jack was a womanizer back in the day but it was more for his charisma(and money) then his physical features. He was an ok looking guy. Jack looked like an everyday joe you see off the street. compare him to say redford an actor jacks age was popular same decade as jack . Redford was on countless of magazine for his good looks he was assocated for it jack was not.

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    • I agree 100%, and in his heyday (which actually may be ongoing) Redford had a large following in terms of sex appeal (funny thing is, Pitts’ fan profile really picked up with 1992’s “A River Runs Through it”, which was directed by Redford).

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    • Well for all that it’s worth, Stephen King didn’t like the idea of Jack Nicholson being cast in Stanley Kubrick’s “The Shining”, because just looking at Nicholson, you can tell right off the bat, that he’s a bit on the eccentric side.

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  3. Michael Keaton has a sensible reason why he stayed away from ‘Batman Forever’ http://uproxx.it/2j2nhPA

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    • I just don’t think that Michael Keaton felt that he had to put his entire heart and soul into Batman. I’m guessing that he initially took the role because he had already worked w/ Tim Burton before in “Beatlejuice” and to show people that he could do stuff besides be funny. Basically, him and Tim Burton were a “packaged deal” regarding Batman.

      I do wonder if Michael was in tune w/ the criticisms and controversies surrounding “Batman Returns”, hence why Warner Bros. brought in Joel Schumacher (for whom he didn’t seem to trust and likely just saw as a studio yes-man) to “make things less dark” in the first place? I do side eye Keaton saying that the script for “Batman Forever” sucked when the final script for “Returns” was an incoherent mess of its own. And ironically, “Forever” ultimately did more for the Bruce Wayne/Batman character than “Returns” did.

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      • Keaton was in tune. Burton was under a lot of pressure from the studio during the making of Batman Returns. At the end of the day, he just didn’t want to make Batman Forever. Even for truckloads of money.

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        • Yeah, I suspect that Keaton’s heart wasn’t fully into doing another Batman movie after “Returns”. He only thought about coming back for “Forever” because that’s what we all expected from him. It became even more obvious once it became certain that Tim Burton wasn’t going to come back. Besides the Burton factor, I suspect that Keaton was wary of the prospects of playing Batman too long and therefore, being too identified (not to mention “repeating himself”) w/ the role.

          The sad irony is that Batman was really the only thing that was keeping Michael Keaton as an A-lister. Virtually none the movies that he did besides the Batman movies during that time frame really captured the public’s imagination. So when he walked away from Batman, he pretty much walked away from the main engine that was powering his career.

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        • I remember reading an interview in Premiere magazine in the summer of ’89 just before Batman came out. And Keaton was very clear that he had no intention of being Adam West. The danger of type casting was very much on his mind when he took the part. He said his biggest feat was that one day he’s be going to car shows dressed as Batman. That was his mindset going in.

          From what I have observed of Keaton, he’d rather be less famous and do the projects he wants to do than more famous by propping up his career with projects that don’t interest him. Post Batman, he was in a position where if he didn’t want to work, he didn’t have to. And at a certain point, he didn’t want to take jobs that interfered with watching baseball games. I don’t think Keaton regrets that decision one bit.

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        • I can understand Keaton showing concern about being typecast as batman and being relegated to personal appearances dressed as Batman; if I was him that would’ve been a concern of mine, as there was a history of that being the case in the past. It just shows that Keaton was thinking ahead, and sometimes if you don’t think ahead, you get left behind.

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        • At that time, typecasting was a big concern. Actors who played superheroes historically had been shut out of other roles. Adam West was the most obvious example, but George Reeves and Christopher Reeve also had to deal with it. There really weren’t any counter-examples of guys who played superheroes without suffering the consequences. When Reeve was cast as Superman, he reached out to Sean Connery who was still trying to shake the notion that he was James Bond. Connery told Reeve to make sure that in between Superman movies, he made other types of pictures. Good advice, but it didn’t work very well for him. So yes, there was very good reason for Keaton to be apprehensive about being too linked to Batman.

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  4. Got a question for @MichaelKeaton? Reply with hash tag #AskHollywood and he may surprise you on Twitter!

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  5. my friend thinks because jack has a reputation for being womanizer he was not sex symbol. But he was charismatic. Jack was never in people magazine beautiful people list. He was never a heartthrob like brad pitt. Part of the reason jack played a lot villians his looks suited those roles. He had hard features . He did not have features that would cast him as hero

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  6. I have a feeling after batman Hollywood wanted to make Keaton a movie star and Keaton just wanted to serious actor but Hollywood did not see him that way . which in turn is why audience strayed away from his serious efforts like the paper and my life

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    • I don’t think Hollywood gave two hoots if Keaton’s career was successful or not. WB just wanted to keep selling a lot of Batman stuff. They didn’t care who was in the suit. As soon as they were sure audiences didn’t care either, they started replacing Batmen left and right.

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      • I remember hearing Joel Schumacher tell a story (on the special features DVD for “Batman & Robin”) from Col. Tom Parker, who was Elvis Presley’s manager. If I remember correctly, Elvis’ white jumpsuit was going to endure long after Elvis was gone. And that was kind of the same thing w/ Batman. It meant no disrespect to Adam West, Michael Keaton, Val Kilmer, George Clooney and subsequently, Christian Bale and Ben Affleck. Batman’s suit (or the image of Batman) will likely endure much longer than any actor portraying him.

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    • I really liked “The Paper” (I think it had hints of “Absence of Malice” in it), but I didn’t really care for “My Life”.

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    • I think that Keaton after “Batman”, could’ve theoretically, embraced his newly found image as an action hero. He was kind of like Bruce Willis in the sense that both started off as quirky comedic actors turned unlikely action heroes (“Die Hard” and “Batman” respectively). It’s just that Keaton kept making movies that nobody else seemingly wanted to see except him. I’ve said before that after “Batman”, Michael Keaton pretty much became lost.

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  7. every franchise from superhero to bond evtually replaces their actor anyways.but I guess simply he was never that bankable outside of batman anyways . in fact before Beetlejuice

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  8. mainly super hero franchise do. Keaton never had much box office clout outside of batman he simply just picked bad films. He was lucky to score hits like birdman and spotlight

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    • The tradition of recasting superheroes started with Keaton. And really, outside of Batman and Spider-Man, it’s not all that common.

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      • If you think of recasting as being when you bring in a new actor for the same character in an ongoing series—and that’s how I would tend to think of it—then it is really rare. The Keaton-Kilmer-Clooney succession as Batman, Ruffalo replacing Norton as the Hulk, and Harrison Ford replacing Alec Baldwin as Jack Ryan, along with the Bond actors, are the only cases involving major characters I can think of.

        What is more common these days is rebooting, as happened with Superman, Spider-Man, The Fantastic Four, etc. Casting new actors is common with a reboot—Bale coming in as Batman in the Dark Knight films, and the wholesale making over of the X-Men, for instance.

        Liked by 2 people

  9. there has been 3 different hulks.three different supermans different fanstic four actors. two different daredevil .two different darkman three different punisher I know there not superhero franichse but jack ryan and bond where played by many different actors

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    • The Supermen are pretty spaced out. Same with the first two Punishers. Generally recasting only occurs when a movie disappoints, not the continuation of a successful franchise as with Batman and Bond.

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  10. the example i gave where just rebooting the movie recasting is same seris just new actors like again ford replaicng baldwin. Speaking of spiderman keaotn has a role in upcoming spiderman which may look like another hit as i said it agian iam sure a lot of people would agree out of all the actors on the blog he has the best current career. 2 back to back best picutre win a role in the hit film minons. plus american assian sounds good i could be wrong but iam guessinf will be more action orientated not a drama that has chance for oscars.

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  11. I thought the paper and my felt like lame tv movies. I felt Keaton felt flat in my life like it was Keaton reading lines not the character .

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  12. I did . I never really saw the fuss in Keaton to me he has no diction. His voice is the same no matter what different emotion his character just trying to go through. Plus he lacks facial cues. HIS face is completely blank when his character is suppose to be angry in some of his movies. with some actors you can tell they have little to no acting training Keaton is one of them, He may take on different roles but plays them the same .

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    • I strongly disagree, but it’s subjective.

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    • That’s not how I’ve seen Keaton; his characters and expressions have felt very much alive to me (especially in films like “Night Shift”, “Gung Ho”, and Beetlejuice”). I’m very fond of both Keaton and Kidman, however, I’m not going to defend “My Life”, since I think that’s just flat all-around. Some people do seem to like it though.

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      • My Life was a schmaltzy movie. I won’t defend it either, but I will say I usually find Keaton to be the opposite of flat. I think he’s a very dynamic actor. I feel like you can see him thinking which is not something every actor conveys.

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        • I agree, I think a lot of times Keaton gives off that impression that he is thinking, which makes him both as an actor and as a character very present. Because, yeah, there’s times with other performers when you get the feeling that they’re not really into the material or seemingly from a different film entirely (though that can be a script problem too though). But Keaton, when he’s there, he’s there for real, so he’s not wasting his time or our time.

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  13. we all have different taste but I never cared for Keaton I rank him lower then ben Affleck(ONE ACTOR I really detest). he impressed me a few times like clean and sober spotlight and birdman but overall a flat actor. plus most of his movies I find lame.

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    • I generally like Affleck and his performances, but I caught a bit of “Forces of Nature” the other day and found his character to be completely unappealing. I guess that was somewhat of a period of decline for him (though I liked his cameo in 2000’s Boiler Room”. If “Go” was the younger generation’s version of “Pulp Fiction”, I guess “Boiler Room” was the same to “Wall Street”).

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  14. lol to each their own. I never cared for Keaton but there are much worse actors then him, happy about his current career is going though I wish all actors even ones I dislike good luck .I though Keaton ruined much ado about nothing while denzel was incredible.

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  15. I was not trying to be mean.Hope Keaton not reading lol this . I am sure Keaton is a nice guy but just not a fan I liked him in some stuff and thought he was good batman despite lacking the build but just not a fan. much like you do not like cruise or Costner lebeau I do not are for Keaton.i guess film is subjective.

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  16. I never get the feeling I can see Keaton thinking. there are times when he is not blank faced he gives same look. he has his trademark confused face.lol at time it looks like he sucked too many lemons lol kidding ,

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  17. beside hollywoodland and good will hunting he never really impressed me. I find him bland but I think matt has talent. ben excels better behind the camera. I stil think he is stronger actor then Keaton. however Keaton made a better batman but ben had the build for batman, but people have different taste actors I love are denzel hanks cruise and Costner

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  18. Keaton wanted to become a serious actor not action star like studio wanted but audience could take him as serious actor.

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    • I think that I said a long time ago, that Michael Keaton never really had a “Philadelphia” a la Tom Hanks (who like Keaton, was during the early part of his career, during the ’80s, was primarily seen as a comedic actor). So the movies that he did make (at least the more dramatic or serious ones) during that time frame, didn’t exactly push his career forward. If anything, they just reinforced the notion that people just wanted to see Michael Keaton be funny or wear a Bat-suit.

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      • Good Point; I think “Clean and Sober” should’ve been Keaton’s “Philadelphia”, but it just didn’t work out that way, which is how it goes in life sometimes.

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        • Ironically, “Clean and Sober” came just before “Batman”. I think the main issue w/ Michael Keaton is that (and I think that I said this before), we wasn’t exactly a traditional leading man. What I mean, it was hard to buy him as a suave, romantic leading man (which makes the image of him landing both Kim Basinger and Michelle Pfeffer in his Batman movies, all the more startling) or a “Jimmy Stewart type everyman” like Tom Hanks for example. Keaton seemed to thrive or excel at playing intense, neurotic people. Sometimes, that type of persona came be difficult to cast w/o the suitable director like say Tim Burton or Ron Howard, whom he often worked w/ at the height of his career.

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        • That perception was likely the possibility at the time.

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  19. the paper made over 40 mill on 6 mill budget any chance it was a hit

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  20. yet why does every website make out to be a flop lebeau was it not a hit for its tiny budget one would think it a hit

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    • These things aren’t cut and dry. You have to provide context. First off, budget figures are industriously fuzzy. Wikipedia says the movie had a budget of $6 million dollars. Does that sound off to anyone? Pulp Fiction came out that same year and had a reported budget closer to 9 million. And everyone involved in that movie took pay cuts. Four Weddings and a Funeral which starred a pre-fame Hugh Grant cost just under $5 mill. The Crow had a budget of over $20 million. Quiz Show cost a whopping $31 million. Doesn’t that feel closer to what The Paper likely cost?

      The Paper had an expensive cast and an A-list director. I figure both Keaton and Ron Howard likely got paid a million each. Glenn Close, Marissa Tomei just after her Oscar win, Robert Duvall… I mean, half mill each? And that’s just the headlining talent.

      Putting that aside, expectations are a factor and perception is reality. Studios often turn a profit on a movie and still consider it a failure. The Paper was aiming for that sweet spot between critical and commercial success. The cast screams “nominate us!” But it’s only nomination was for Best Song. The studio gave it a limited release to try to build word of mouth. When it opened, it came in third behind D2: The Mighty Ducks and Major League II – neither of which were new releases. It actually hung on to third place for the entire month of April with modest drops, but it wasn’t a very competitive season.

      The Paper ended up being the 36th highest grossing movie of the year just behind Nobody’s Fool and ahead of On Deadly Ground and Richie Rich. If other sites are saying it was a flop, well, they are mistaken. But I wouldn’t call it a hit either. It was a modest performer.

      And I seriously question the budget reported on Wikipedia. Google tells me it’s $20 million. That sounds a lot more plausible.

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  21. i can not find any websites indicating budget for my life yet website link that as a flop

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  22. paper was released in march if they where aiming for Oscars they would released in more reasonable Oscar date

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  23. i do not think silence was aiming for Oscars though it just happened I think silence was just meant to be a standard horror flick if producers of paper where really aiming for Oscar thwy would campaigned it by release it more Oscar friendly date

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    • Yeah, “The Silence of the Lambs” was some kind of miracle all the way around; I mean, when do horror movies (Oh, it was sold as a “Psychological Thriller”, but we all know better, and the killer is that horror was down the drain in that era) get heaped with acclaim like that?

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  24. I must say out of all the batman actors kilmer doing the worst. ben and Clooney are bankable ,bale appeared in a lot of hits and Keaton appeared in 2 back to back best picture winners and Spider-Man,

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  25. bad film choices and being a prick went hand and hand with kilmer. Keaton did have his phidlehia he had birdman and spotlight two dramatic films he was praised for

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  26. he mAde those flicks now I guess you can say Keaton is taken more seriously as actor now .obviously lol he never would made birdman early in his career because its about a washed up superhero actor and he was not washed up superhero actor in 90s lol. Interesting you mentioned Philadelphia because Keaton turned it down to do another film about a dying man with disease my life. He had Oscar buzz for clean and sober but the films bad reviews hurt its chances. I see more Oscar noms in Keaton future

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  27. Jon Peters Admits Christopher Nolan Banned Him from Man of Steel Set

    http://www.denofgeek.com/us/movies/superman/261436/jon-peters-admits-christopher-nolan-banned-him-from-man-of-steel-set

    But looking back at those heady days, Peters also now claims to have had a tumultuous affair with Kim Basinger during the production of Batman in 1988, which apparently made Michael Keaton jealous.

    “Kim had a husband who was abusive,” Peters claims. “And one day I grabbed him, and she connected with me because I protected her, and we became friends and ended up having a big affair. Michael Keaton had the eye for Kim Basinger. I remember he got mad at me when she and I hooked up. He felt rejected ‘cause he was the star. He’s Batman. Yeah. I was a hairdresser who could talk to women. We lived together on the set. She helped me write the third act.”

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  28. Michael Keaton Feels ‘Terrible’ About His ‘Hidden Fences’ Golden Globes Gaffe

    http://www.lipstickalley.com/showthread.php/1129811-Michael-Keaton-Feels-Terrible-About-His-Hidden-Fences-Golden-Globes-Gaffe?s=cb3125519b7d047db698ae5400fded03

    Michael Keaton feels awful for his “Hidden Fences” Golden Globe gaffe. The Spotlight actor, 65, opened up about the blunder while attending the Founderpremiere in L.A. on Wednesday, January 11.

    “I’m very, very sorry about that,” Keaton told Us Weekly. “I feel very badly.

    As previously reported, Keaton accidentally combined the movies Fences andHidden Figures while announcing the nominees for best supporting actress at the star-studded affair on Sunday. The mistake was later turned into a meme.

    “I get that people thought I was nonchalant about it. … I get it now,” he toldUs. “At the time, I thought, I don’t know what people are talking about. …’ Since then, people have told me, ‘Well, people are upset for this other reason.’ That truly makes me feel horrible now. I feel badly that people feel badly.”

    Keaton specifically apologized to those involved in the films. “I’m very sorry for the people that were affected by that,” he added. “Especially the people in the movie, who worked so hard, and in front of millions of people, I, like a jerk, screwed the line up. What I always think about is they have brothers and sisters and mothers and fathers and friends at home waiting for them, watching them, and this guy, me, gets up and gives the wrong title! That makes me feel terrible.”

    Keaton wasn’t the only one to say the wrong movie title. Earlier in the night,Today show correspondent Jenna Bush Hager made the same “Hidden Fences” mistake while speaking with Pharrell Williams on the red carpet. Williams, 43, was nominated for Best Original Score for Hidden Figures at the show.

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  29. people are making a big deal about nothing. in many award show people mis pronounce names all the time god people are sensitive. lol I must say though Keaton interview are as awkward as his acting on film lol. I laugh when people put Keaton and hanks in same sentence hanks is more talented versatile.

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  30. I hope this does hurt his career cause that small mistake . I wonder if he did not turn down Philadelphia he would had hanks career. I still do not see that many similartes because there are a lot of comic actors who tried dipping into drama robin willians jim carrery and bill murra. Not really sure who I would compare keaotn career too

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  31. I would probably compare Keaton career to depp without the heartthrob status. both played oddballs with a lot of energy. batman did for Keaton career what pirates did for depp. batman brought Keaton mainstream success. only difference Keaton was never really a draw and depp was at one point

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  32. its not that embarrassing. |there have been numerous occasions when host mispronounce name of nominees.

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    • Also embarrassing. This one additionally so because of the racial component. The same mistake was made at the Globes at the red carpet. The implication is that white folks can’t tell black movies apart.

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  33. still not a big deal in my book. Its not like his intentions where to be racist.

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    • Yeah, but in today’s PC- touchy feely society, one can’t say much without an individual or an organization getting all bent out of shape. I mean, I’m ultra-sensitive too, but c’mon, let’s be real, too many people seem to go out of there way to feel offended.

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  34. its like when tim allen accidently called 30 rock 3rd rock in the golden globe these things happen.

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  35. the founder had so much hype but its lack of award noms makes me think it will get snubbed for best actor. however given its low budget and the fact its already 2 mill I do not see it flopping

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  36. earlier founder had a lot of buzz but buzz died down. iam wondering was much ado about nothing really a hit 36 mill out of 11 mill seems more modest

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  37. dustin Hoffman did not look like a traditional leading man yet he was a huge draw for years neither did deniro pacino or even carell it did not stop them from having huge career. like I said if Keaton capitalized on batman he could have had the career had after pirate since keaotn played the roles depp late played in his career, his problem was simply he wanted to do roles he wanted not audience wanted to see

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  38. the founder made 6 mill on a 7 mill budget its only on its 2nd week that’s a good start given its small budget it could aculay become a hit

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  39. Michael Keaton just wants us to give Trump a chance

    http://pagesix.com/2017/01/22/michael-keaton-just-wants-us-to-give-trump-a-chance/?utm_source=zergnet.com&utm_medium=referral&utm_campaign=zergnet_1421954

    Michael Keaton is standing up against the Hollywood rebellion about President Donald Trump.

    The “Founder” star was at A-list hot spot the Tower Bar in West Hollywood, Calif., on Saturday night.

    Keaton got up to speak to Al Pacino and John Travolta, who were dining with Sunset Tower Hotel and Tower Bar owner Jeff Klein.

    Keaton was overheard saying, “Enough with the Hollywood BS. I didn’t vote for him, but we’ve got to just give him a chance at this point . . .”

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  40. lebeau which actor do u think is more talented hanks or Keaton . I feel hanks has more range overall has a more consistent career

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  41. Love isn’t all around case file #80: The Mary Tyler Moore Hour

    http://www.avclub.com/article/love-isnt-all-around-case-file-80-mary-tyler-moore-249580

    The supporting cast is fun, particularly Keaton as a horny usher who is perpetually on the make. Either he’s trying to get laid, or he’s executing some manner of low-level scam of dubious legality and morality despite being a raging airhead who seems to live in a world of his own. It takes a little while for Keaton to develop the character beyond “horny scumbag” (an archetype 1970s TV had a much higher tolerance for) but by the time he’s trying to impress guest star Paul Williams (who he hopes will become his songwriting mentor) with a hastily composed composition combining the five most famous songs he knows, he’s nailed the character and established himself as a standout.

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  42. Every Batman Voice, Ranked Worst To Best

    http://screenrant.com/batman-voice-actors-ranked-worst-best/

    MICHAEL KEATON (BURTON BATMAN)

    Before he became Batman, Michael Keaton was the eccentric star of Mr. Mom and Beetlejuice. Known for his off-beat style and sense of humor, Keaton came to Gotham City from the least likely of backgrounds. Thanks to Tim Burton’s inspired vision for the 1989 Batman, he turned Keaton into the fearsome and complex Dark Knight that no one else could have foreseen. Ben McKenzie’s Batman owes a debt of gratitude to Keaton, who popularized the low-key and grumbling version of the Caped Crusader. With a stoic face, unblinking eyes, and a throaty voice, Keaton’s Batman is a straight-up intimidator.

    Contrast that brooding with his more ebullient Bruce Wayne, the bachelor who has the hallmark tics and traits we’ve come to expect from Keaton. While he’s introspective and thoughtful, as Bruce Wayne should be, he’s markedly different than he is in the suit. Michael Keaton’s Batman almost seems to enjoy his time in the cape and cowl, like it’s an escape from his otherwise neurotic and schizophrenic persona.

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