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Totally Awesome Facts You Need to Know About Seven

Seven

David Fincher’s feel-good movie of 1995, Seven or Se7en if you prefer, was released 20 years ago today.  And Sgt. Pepper taught the band to play.  Sorry, this movie can be a bit of a downer.  So I figured I’d start us off with a bit of goofiness.  Also, if we’re going to discuss the facts you need to know about Seven, we’re going to have to get spoilery.  Granted, these spoilers are two decades old, but they are spoilers all the same.  If you haven’t seen Seven and you intend to see it, go watch it right now and then come back for all the totally awesome fact you need to know.

Seven - Gluttony

This is how IMDB summarizes the plot of the movie:

Two detectives, a rookie and a veteran, hunt a serial killer who uses the seven deadly sins as his modus operandi.

That’s a completely accurate description and yet, it makes the movie sound kind of cheesy.  That’s because while Seven may sound like it’s just another serial killer movie like the dozen or so others Morgan Freeman has made, it’s not.  As Amy Taubin writes about the movie

What’s striking about Seven is that the detectives never get the better of the killer. They’re two steps behind him from beginning to end, and so are we. It’s a police procedural/horror hybrid in which the fascination with death outweighs the logic of detection. There’s almost no violence enacted on the screen. There are no scenes of the killer stalking his victims. The film refuses that kind of cheap thrill. All we see is the evidence of violence.

The suggestion of violence in Seven is more disturbing then most blood-soaked slasher movies.  You might think that the inspiration for such a twisted tale may come from a real life case file.  But it didn’t.  Screenwriter Andrew Kevin Walker was inspired by the miseries of trying to make it in New York City.  Walker was working a regular job at Tower Records while writing low-budget exploitation movies at night.  According to Walker:

I didn’t like my time in New York, but it’s true that if I hadn’t lived there I probably wouldn’t have written Seven.

Seven - Pitt and Freeman

Walker originally wrote the part of the veteran cop, Sommerset, with William Hurt in mind.  He named the character after his favorite author, W. Somerset Maugham.  Early on, Al Pacino was courted for the role, but he opted to make City Hall instead.  Denzel Washington and Sylvester Stallone both turned down the role of the rookie cop, Mills.

Not surprisingly, New Line Cinema wasn’t keen on Walker’s original ending.  This is where the spoilers come in, folks.  The movie ends with the killer, played by Kevin Spacey, showing the rookie cop, played by Brad Pitt, his young wife’s head in a box.  Filled with rage, Pitt kills Spacey and completes the themed murders by enacting wrath.  It’s a serious bummer.

New Line demanded that Walker re-write the ending.  They wanted something more typical of the genre with the two cops on a race to save the rookie’s wife.  Walker wrote the studio the ending they wanted.  But the original ending was saved when the studio accidentally sent the original script to director David Fincher.

Fincher had made a name for himself directing music videos like Madonna’s Express Yourself.

The rain is kind of a dead give-away, isn’t it?

Seven - Freeman Box

In 1992, Fincher made his feature film debut directing Alien 3.  I’ll save the details for a later article, but I think it’s safe to say that movie was a disaster.  The studio ruined any chance Alien 3 had of being good.  Fincher was so traumatized by the experience that he considered giving up directing.  But he was lured back to the director’s chair when he read Walker’s script with the original ending.

Fincher knew when he agreed to make the movie that he would have to fight the studio to keep the ending.  Early on, Producer Arnold Kopelson drew a line in the sand.  He told Fincher, “Look me right in the eye, because this movie will never end with a head in the box.”

What followed was a lot of wrangling.  The director was able to sell Freeman and Pitt on the “head-in-a-box” ending.  Pitt had just come off the movie Legends of the Fall where his favorite scene in the movie was cut after negative reaction from test audiences.  So Pitt took steps to make sure that didn’t happen to him again.  In 2011, Pitt told Entertainment Weekly:

With Seven, I said, ‘I will do it on one condition – the head stays in the box. Put in the contract that the head stays in the box.’ Actually, there was a second thing, too: ‘He’s got to shoot the killer in the end. He doesn’t do the ‘right’ thing, he does the thing of passion.’ Those two things are in the contract. Cut to: Seven has been put together, and they’ve tested it. They go, ‘You know, he would be much more heroic if he didn’t shoot John Doe – and it’s too unsettling with the head in the box. We think maybe if it was the dog’s head in the box…’

Seven - Paltrow

At one point, a compromise was considered in which Pitt’s character did not get to shoot Spacey.  Instead, Freeman would have killed Spacey in order to spare the young cop’s life.  Freeman recalled:

I first understood the ending to be — and it made sense to me — that the sacrifice was going to be Somerset’s, that this young policeman was salvageable.

Storyboards depicting an alternate ending for Seven

Storyboards depicting an alternate ending for Seven

But Pitt insisted that it had to be his character that shot the killer.  He explained that his character would be so full of rage upon learning that his pregnant wife had been decapitated, that he couldn’t NOT take vengeance.

Ultimately, Fincher was able to convince Kopleson to let him shoot his ending:

I just said, ‘Long after we’re all gone — 50, 60 years from now — a bunch of 20-somethings will be at a cocktail party talking about a movie that they saw on the late show the night before … the ‘head-in-the-box movie.’ I said, ‘This is the head-in-the-box movie. Every person I’ve talked to … knows it as the head-in-the-box movie. You can’t take the head in the box out of the head-in-the-box movie.’ And he thought about it, and he kind of smiled and said, ‘OK. Do it.’

Fincher did give the studio an inch.  They asked for a coda at the end in which Freeman’s character quotes Ernest Hemmingway.  Neither Freeman nor Fincher liked the coda, but they acquiesced since New Line had agreed to the “head-in-a-box” finale.

Seven Spacey

Pitt wasn’t the only one who was dictating terms to the studio.  Kevin Spacey insisted that his name should not appear in the credits.  He felt it would make the reveal that much more surprising if audiences didn’t know he was in the movie,  According to Spacey, the studio took some convincing:

It took two days to sell [the studio] on the idea. Later, they were very happy. The bonus was that I was in a movie that made more than $300 million worldwide, and I didn’t have to do a single interview.

Spacey asked Fincher if he should shave his head for the part.  Fincher offered to shave his head too if Spacey did.  So they were both shaved bald during filming.

Seven - Paltrow

Gwyneth Paltrow was reluctant to appear in the movie.  But Fincher had been impressed with her performance in the drama, Flesh and Bone.  Fortunately, Paltrow was dating Pitt at the time.  Fincher asked Pitt to convince his girlfriend to make the movie.

Seven is known for its non-stop downpours.  It is raining in nearly every scene.  This wasn’t originally planned nor was it purely a stylistic choice.  The filmmakers were rushing to film all of Brad Pitt’s scenes because he would be leaving soon to make Twelve Monkeys.  There was heavy rain on his first day of filming, so rain was added to later scenes to maintain continuity.

While filming a rainy chase scene, Pitt accidentally slipped and fell.  On his way down, he smashed a car’s windshield.  The injury required surgery.  As a result, it was incorporated into the movie.

Seven - Pride

Fincher insisted on incredible attention to detail.  All the hand-written books in the killer’s apartment were real.  It took the production team two months to complete them at an estimated cost of $15,000 dollars.  Morgan Freeman’s character has a line that it would take the police two months to read all the books.

After the success of Seven, the studio wanted a sequel.  Fincher said he would rather poke his eyes out than make a sequel.  Thankfully, that wasn’t necessary.  The sequel never gained any traction.

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Posted on September 22, 2015, in facts you need to know, Movies and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 52 Comments.

  1. Seven is on my list of “movies that I’m glad I saw once, because of the quality, but that I probably won’t ever want to see again,” just because that ending is such a downer. Thank goodness no one ever tried to make a sequel!

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    • I don’t think I have watched it a second time either. It blew me away the first time I saw it and I stand up and applaud Fincher and company for sticking to that ending. But if I ever gave it a second viewing, it was a long time ago. I have to admit, writing this article made me want to go back and watch it again. I’m especially interested in how violent the film is or probably more accurately, how violent it isn’t. My memory of the movie was that it was extremely disturbing. But looking back, most of the violence is merely suggested rather than shown. That’s pretty cool.

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      • I suspect that leaving the violence to the viewer’s imagination for the most part is probably what makes the film so disturbing. I agree that Fincher, et. al., deserve credit for sticking to their guns about the ending; anything less would have undermined the whole atmosphere the film was trying to create.

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  2. Seven is one of my favorite movies that have been made during my lifetime (born 1981). It is not a movie that I have sought out to watch over and over again, but I have seen it more than once and its impact remains, though the reasons for that impact have changed over time due to the facts that 1. you can only see that ending once for the first time, and 2. there is a lot going on in that movie that comes out with repeat viewings.

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    • The attention to detail really was incredible. So I can definitely see where it would benefit from repeat viewings even if the shock of the ending is no longer there.

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      • Brad Pitt and Morgan Freeman have a lot of chemistry. The Mills/Somerset relationship has a lot of nuance. Same with Brad and Gweneth. Even Gweneth and Morgan in their brief time together on screen have a certain chemistry and their characters have interesting things to say and do with each other. Not much to say about Kevin Spacey, just a great performance as the killer. And of course, R. Lee Emery is always interesting in roles that don’t call for his Sgt. Hartman routine. Just a great cast playing characters inhabiting a fully realized environment of soul-crushing sin and urban decay.

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  3. Seven is a very impressive film. Dark as hell, which explains why I haven’t seen the film since the 90’s, but a very impressive film nonetheless. Reading this article really makes me want to watch this again, to be honest. Seven solidified a few things for me 20 years ago. One, Brad Pitt was more than a pretty face. He really was an actor with talent. Two, Alien 3 showed a glimpse that David Fincher had talent but here it was fully realized. This is where I began taking notice of Fincher and his work. The Game (very underrated film) and especially Fight Club further cemented that. And three, boy Kevin Spacey really was on a roll at this point at his career, wasn’t he?

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    • I had similar reactions. Seven was the movie that made me sit up and take notice of Pitt and Fincher. And it confirmed that Spacey had it going on. Although I’m pretty sure I saw Seven before The Usual Suspects.

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  4. It’s one movie that I own on DVD. But like Taxi Driver and Blue Velvet, I need to be in the right mood to watch it. That ending is one of the biggest gut punches in any film.

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    • I agree; this film is definitely not for casual viewing. I totally place this film in the category of “Films One Has To Be Up For”.

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      • That would make for an interesting article or topic of its own, wouldn’t it? Taxi Driver, which was mentioned earlier by someone else, is one of my favorite movies ever that really requires you to be in the right mood to watch. Brilliant movie yes, but not exactly a casual watch. Same for Schindler’s List, one of the greatest movies ever made if you ask me in its raw power and Spielberg’s gifted skill, but its not as endlessly re-watchable as Raiders of the Lost Ark that’s for sure.

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        • Ha ha, I thought that too. It really could be an entire topic: “Films One Has To Be Up For”. I’m thinking that could be a long list. “Se7en” is in my personal top five, as is 1978’s “I Spit on Your Grave”. 1987’s “Angel Heart” is another one for me like that.

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        • Something much better than a cinematic sequel could spring from Seven: a Lebeau topic “Films One Has To Be In The Mood For.” And best of all, neither Pitt, Freeman nor Fincher get final creative call on this one. May I be the first to say this goes in the contract.

          Long after we’re gone – 50, 60 years from now – a bunch of 20-somethings will be at a cocktail party talking about a thread they saw on the internet the night before – the “Films One has To Be In The Mood For” topic. And Lebeau thought about it, and he kind of smiled and said, “Ok, let’s do it.” 😉

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        • Yeah Lebeau is all sitting in the chair, feet akimbo, smoking the cigar handed to him by Jack Warner, thinking “Yeah yeah doll, gotta have that on my website, let’s move on this”. Okay, maybe not that, well except for Lebeau sitting on a chair, and not sounding like the Marx Brothers.

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        • Funny. You guys are killing me!

          So true story, we’re trying to sell our house and it hasn’t been going well. I’m thinking I might throw in my desk and the laptop WTHH was created on. Think that would sell the house? We switched realtors just this week and my new realtor tells me I need to replace my desk chair because it doesn’t match the rest of the furniture. Apparently my work space isn’t quite glamorous enough.

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        • I’ve heard some real winners when it comes to realty excuses, but having an issue with a desk chair is real picky. What, something wrong with the mailbox too?

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        • Actually. yes. Now that you mention that. I’m also supposed to replace my mailbox. You should probably work in real estate.

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        • Ha! I’ve been a part of some big moves, so I’ve heard the whole spiel from realtors, the lookie lou neighbors, the nitpicking from potential buyers, things like that. But Real Estate is too dog eat dog for me. Also, I’d probably be too blunt with my opinions on what I’d be trying to sell, and likely not have the killer instinct to close.

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        • LOL. Thumbs up!

          I need to recruit more writers! Too many topics, too little time!

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  5. Great write-up; yeah, I have this film on DVD. I have the soundtrack too (though I had to go in a different direction to find David Bowie’s ” The Heart’s Filthy Lesson” which I think is an awesome tune). It’s a dark film, but as my friend Jose said, after you watch it, you get that good movie feeling.

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  6. Why in the world would the part of a rookie cop been offered to Sylvester Stallone OR Denzel Washington? Washington was over 40 and Stallone was almost 50. Are studios really so clueless that they’d consider a 50 year old rookie believable? Doing a sequel sounds completely ridiculous as well- the story was completely and entirely resolved. And since there’s only 7 deadly sins and Spacey’s killer had completed murders for every one of them, “7 Two” wouldn’t make any sense. I suppose you could make a script about a copycat killer, but why would you?

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    • I imagine if either of those actors had taken the part, the character would have been rewritten so as not to be a rookie. That sort of thing isn’t at all uncommon. You just change a few words and the character is a recent transfer instead of a rookie.

      I agree a sequel doesn’t sound appealing which is why it never happened. But it wouldn’t be hard at all to do another thriller starring Freeman’s character. Reportedly, they wanted Pitt’s character to be in a mental institution. I don’t know if we would have seen him or if he would have just been referenced. I’m guessing sequel talks never got that far. Since Pitt wouldn’t have come back, I would think there would just be a line like “I heard about what happened to your partner” to explain his absence.

      You wouldn’t necessarily need to stick with the seven deadly sins if you did a sequel. But it probably didn’t happen because as you say, there was no need. It would have been a bad idea. Especially without Fincher.

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  7. Maybe it was rewritten to rookie cop after those two turned it down. Those 2 did mention regretting turning it down . Pity since I thought pitt was miscast in it . Not a fan of him.Denzel would have owned role. Pitt was outacted by freeman and spacey in his tiny role in it

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    • Well, it would have sucked with Stallone, so there’s no need for regret, I think. It would not have done the same thing for his career as it did for Pitt’s. If Stallone had taken it, I think the whole cast probably would have been different (although Paltrow wasn’t necessarily an indispensable element) and Fincher might not have been interested as well. I think it would have ended up the slightly cheesy thriller that the one-line IMDB description makes it sound like, had it starred Sylvester Stallone. Denzel, I’m not sure. I can’t imagine him playing someone as vulnerable as Pitt’s Mills. I associate him with characters who are always in control and come out on top.

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      • I agree. I’m glad Seven turned out the way it did. It’s the movie it was supposed to be. Stallone has a tendency to come on to a movie and steamroll his would-be collaborators. So I’m sure it would have turned into a typical Stallone movie and we wouldn’t be talking about it 20 years later.

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  8. John q he was vulnerable same thing with flight. The characters Denzel plays tend to be tough confident on outside but weak on outside. No doubt he could have done well with Seven .I just found pitt lifeless in his roles. The reaction when he find his wife head in the box felt like acting in a grade school play. Of course thats my opinion lots of people like pitt acting so I respect their opinion. Stallone is no deniro. HEs not one of my favrourties but no where near the worst( kutcher takes that title) however hes muich better then given credit. Watching copland showed he can play serious role. He picked alot of entertaining but cheesey action roles that diminished his reputation as actor I think he would done well in seven. I did overall enjoy the movie . Spacey really freaked me out in his role. I like they kep t his character back story mysterious creates mystique to the character.

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    • I liked Pitt’s performance in the movie. He’s not my favorite actor, but I respect him. Denzel Washington has never been a favorite of mine. I think of him as sort of a black Tom Cruise- the guy who’s always the hero, always the nice guy, always does the right thing, and likes to be in big epic productions. I think I liked him best in “Philadelphia” because he started out as a little bit of an asshole and you got to see him change a little. I think Washington wouldn’t have provided that yin yang quality to the film that you had with Pitt and Morgan Freeman as partners. Stallone, I feel, can do a little bit more than what he’s known for (which is nothing but fill up space with muscles), he’s just rarely been bothered too. In “First Blood”, I think he took some care in making Rambo confused and damaged and not just some righteous badass standing up to evil lawmen, but the sequels undermined that and turned him into a plain old action hero. I don’t mind Stallone, but I think people can agree he would have sucked in ‘Seven’. I agree with you that Spacey was excellent. I suppose other actors could have handled the role, but he did really bring something unique. Paltrow didn’t really matter; her character was, unfortunately, just “the wife”. Any decently talented actress would do.

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  9. PAltrow just damsel in distress that looked pretty. SHe was dispensable . Spacey put unique twist what could been cliched over top performance. Denzel (and tom cruise for that matter) has more range the you think training day he was villian, back to john q he wasnt a typically villain but it wasnt exactly shoot them up save day characters he played before. HE was flawed character brough depth to it. HE started off as abitter douche in glory. Similair to cruise his characters have character devolpment they go through change. I tend to think pitt gets out acted alot by his costars hes so bland. But thats my opinion .

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    • Perhaps. Denzel Washington just doesn’t appeal to me that much. The type of films he usually stars in don’t usually appeal to me- including ‘John Q’, zero interest- so that’s part of it. His mojo just doesn’t work on me.

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  10. Your entitled to your opinion . As you can tell brad pitt dosent appeal to me either. I am a huge Denzel and tom cruise fan those actors are amazing. It would been neat for denzel morgan reunion. Plus I also admire spacey a lot so seeing those 2 interact on screen would be priceless. I did like pitt in his other fincher role fight club. That role did well. People have different taste my favourite is tom hanks and i have met a few people who disagree. My 2nd is Costner lol i met alot who disagree. Film is subjective

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    • I’m not really a ‘fan’ of actors in general; I just like some more or less than others. It’s rare that I will see a movie BECAUSE it has certain actors in it or not watch it because of certain actors. Most are neutral to me, and Brad Pitt falls into that category. I think he’s a good actor, but I don’t take any special interest in him. I like Josh Brolin, Adrien Brody, Joaquin Phoenix and Edward Norton, Julianne Moore, and I like Michelle Williams a lot. I don’t specifically dislike too many actors either- don’t care too much for Gwyneth Paltrow, but not to the point that I’d specifically refuse to watch a movie because she’s in it. Kristen Stewart, Mila Jovovich, Mickey Rourke, Tom Cruise…don’t like them. Every other actor that doesn’t fall into any of those lists is neither here nor there for me personally. I mean, Madonna’s terrible of course, but I wouldn’t go so far as to call her an ‘actor’.

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  11. I dont watch movies for actors either but there are actors i like. There tons of movies i try to watch even thought i dislike the actors in it. With exception of cruise i also dislike the actors your mentioned. actors i dislike alot are eastwood quaid pitt michael keaton kutcher willis

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    • Yeah, I’ll still view a film even if I don’t care much for the performer (s). For example, I don’t care much for either Gwyneth Paltrow or Reese Witherspoon, but I’ll view films they’re in.

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      • After Sweet Home Alabama, Reese Witherspoon was on my Do Not Watch List for about a decade.

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        • Walk The Line revived my faith in her which had been faded after her great performance in Election was followed by that aforementioned piece of dreck and two legally Blonde movies.

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        • She’s one of those actors, kind of like Matthew McConaughey, who CAN act but occasionally chooses not to- the quality of the material is secondary to the paycheck. That’s why I like Josh Brolin- according to him, his career slumped after a good start because he was too picky. I like Ewan McGregor, too- nonwhorish actors are my favorite. I also like Jim Sturgess because while he doesn’t always pick winners and his taste falters, he does take risks in his choices.

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      • I like Paltrow the best when she’s playing weirdos, like Margo Tannenbaum and Lucy in ‘Moonlight and Valentino’. I like her the least when she’s playing posh princess types, sophisticated ladies and “hot chick” roles. I don’t find her sexy.

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  12. reese redmepded herself with wild and inherent vice . she dosent always pick good scripts but does good job in them lets not forget nic cage who cna honestly act but chooses bad films. He much more talented than that . These random b movies he picks requires him to be over the top at times. But he can be subtle. :Lets not forget talented spacey who spent the 90s doing good work only to aim for more oscars in lame tearjerks then seem fitted for lifetime movies.

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    • Seriously? She was barely in ‘Inherent Vice’. If her character hadn’t existed, it would not have made any difference to the story at all. All the female characters in ‘Inherent Vice’ were throwaways, including and especially the girlfriend. It was Phoenix and Brolin’s movie. She was fine in the film, but that one role would not be significant enough to redeem a spotty career. Films like ‘Mud’ and ‘Wild’ build a much better case for her redeemability. I don’t think she has bad taste in films, I think she’s just greedy and will agree to appear in bad films if they have high box office potential- it’s not because she doesn’t know they’re bad. She’s in it for the big payday more than the art, despite her talent.

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  13. A lot of actor have picked films for wrong reasons because it will help their career or money. Its common in hollywood why not take advantage of business pays that well/ Michael caine gene hakcman deniro pacino and duvall all admitted to take roles for money all of them are still respected. I respect clooney way of picking films he makes one film for and that the audience will enjoy make tons of money in the process. Its good way of balancing things out.

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    • Oh, she’s by no means unique in that respect. Hollywood actors who AREN’T in it for the money are the exception, opportunists happy to whore out their gifts are the rule. Also, sometimes it’s not their fault- sometimes they sort of have to do a movie because of their studio contract or pressure from their agent. Even some of the most respected people end up in tacky things- look at Kathy Bates. What the fuck was she doing in “The Waterboy”?
      Regarding Paltrow, her lack of box office hits isn’t the problem with my opinion. Quality and popularity are two entirely different beasts. Look at Jennifer Jason Leigh- she’s only been in two films, Fast Times At Ridgemount High and Single White Female. However, she’s done very few films where she wasn’t great and there’s very little in her filmography that’s not worth being proud of. I’ll take ‘Georgia’ over ‘Country Strong’ any day.

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  14. I always found paltrow acting bland. Just my opinion. after sliding doors it she was a list briefly. However her career waned alot after her oscar win. Iron man saved her but aside from contagina she kept making flops. the iron man type movies are the only hits she cna have

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  15. paltrow does choose alot of bad films. Not defending paltrow but how a movie looks on script is differnet then on screen. In hands of worst of director an oscar winning script could turn out looking like michale bay flick. Maybe she thought her bad scripts seemed fine on paper

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    • Well, I think it’s clear that she’s into being a ‘star’ and not just a humble thespian dedicated to her art. If that were so she wouldn’t be hawking frozen food in Japan and shit. I think she knew that “Shallow Hal” was not a Lars Von Trier film, ya know. But of course many films do have good scripts and could have been much more than what they turned out to be- mistakes in directing, editing, and acting can surely sink a good script. But there is no pretending that a blatantly low-brow film is something deeper than it is. It’s not even really that I think her filmography is bad, it’s just something about her demeanor that does not appeal to me. Personally, if I were the All-Powerful Goddess of Cinema, I would go back in time and recast all Gwyneth Paltrow movies that were worth a fuck with Evan Rachel Wood.

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  16. But i agree Sometimes it better to be in good film that makes no money in box office then bad film box office hit. Shawhsank bombed in the box office but its stand test of time. The week shawshank opened no one remembers or cares what the number 1 movie of that week was.

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    • Julianne Moore has no huge blockbuster hits, yet still a doubly more impressive career. If you’re really, truly good, you don’t even a hit. Hell, even Paltrow’s mom Blythe Danner has a more respectable body of work than her daughter without ever being a top billing star. One thing that’s clearly demonstrated on “What the Hell Happened” is that some actors can work forever, while others hit a certain age or a certain stage in their career and become like chewing gum that lost it’s flavor. I don’t think that Paltrow’s going to have fabulous a career into her 50s and beyond like Meryl Streep or Helen Mirren. Kate Winslet probably will, but not the Goop. People will get tired of her by then; they’re a little tired of her already.

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  17. Holy cow, do I love SEVEN! I was at the theater on opening night, and when Sloth awoke, you wouldn’t believe the screams! It was a great, stylistic achievement for Fincher. It made him the superstar director he is today. The cast is perfect. Anecdote: SEVEN came out about three weeks after THE USUAL SUSPECTS, which I had also seen on opening day. There’s a scene in SEVEN where they’re at the killer’s apartment. He comes home and stops at the end of the hall. He’s wearing an overcoat and a hat. At that time we don’t know who the killer is. I turn to my friend and say, “It’s Keyser Soze!”

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