Advertisements

Did Batman and Robin really kill anyone’s careers?

Silverstone - Batman and Robin 1

Batman & Robin is the textbook definition of an infamous film. It’s considered one of the worst movies ever made, it’s almost every comic fan’s example of a terrible comic book movie, and, at the time, it was considered a franchise killer for the Batman series.  It was also considered a career killer for many of the people who worked on it. However, is that really true or has the effect this movie had on their careers been exaggerated?

Well, let’s look at Joel Schumacher, the director of the film. Batman & Robin is considered the movie that killed his career but that’s not particularly true because he spent 10 years directing mainstream studio fare after it, including 8MM, Bad Company, Phone Booth, The Phantom of the Opera, and The Number 23. If the movie really killed his career, would major studios really have given him that many chances?

However, while the movie didn’t kill his career, it did ruin his reputation.  Despite the fact that he has some decent films like The Lost Boys under his belt, he’s pretty much considered one of the worst directors ever thanks to Batman & Robin. And this could explain why most of those movies, besides Phone Booth, which was a modest success, bombed at the box office. I think it was those bombs, and not Batman & Robin, that really killed his career.

But what about the actors?

Two actors whose careers it’s said Batman & Robin ruined are Alicia Silverstone‘s and Chris O’Donnell’s.  But, in this case, I think it started the downfall of their careers rather than killed them outright.

Alicia’s career was pretty much killed by Excess Baggage and Blast From the Past. Batman & Robin was Step 1 for the death of her career as, due to the fact that it was a box office disappointment (plus the fact that Columbia Pictures was not particularly fond of her).  Excess Baggage bombed at the box office after getting little to no promotion. However, she still had a chance to resurrect her career if Blast From the Past was a hit. Yet, despite having better reviews than Batman & Robin and Excess Baggage, that movie bombed at the box office as well. After THAT movie, she has never headlined a major film again. In fact, she’s mostly stuck to independent films and, when she has been in a more mainstream movie (i.e. Scooby Doo 2, Beauty Shop, Tropic Thunder, and the upcoming Diary of a Wimpy Kid movie), it’s been in supporting roles. So, if anything, it was Blast From the Past that killed her career rather than Batman & Robin.

Chris O’Donnell was stuck in a similar situation. It definitely hurt his career but he was still given chances to headline another major film. Yet, both of those choices kinda killed his career. After Batman & Robin, he starred in The Bachelor and Vertical Limit and, domestically, both of those movies were box office disappointments. After that, he’s mostly stuck to TV shows and supporting roles. Yet, it’s a little different for him because the reason he stepped out of the limelight was not only due to the fact that, since Batman & Robin, his movies bombed but he also took a bit of a break to focus on family. Therefore, even if The Bachelor and Vertical Limit were huge hits, he probably would’ve focused on his family and that might’ve slowed his career down.

Another career Batman & Robin is blamed for ruining is Uma Thurman‘s…at least until Kill Bill came along.

But, like with Alicia and Chris, it hurt her career but it didn’t ruin it. No, if anything, it was the double act of Batman & Robin and The Avengers (’98) that killed her career as both were attempts at making her a movie star after audiences took note of her due to her breakout performance in Pulp Fiction. Yet both movies failed at making Uma a movie star and she pretty much stuck to independent films until Kill Bill was a huge hit. Yet, if anything, history repeated itself as Uma has now pretty much stuck to independent movies again after Be Cool, Prime, The Producers, and My Super Ex-Girlfriend all failed at making her a movie star. If anything, Uma’s always been more of an independent film actress and her attempts at becoming a movie star didn’t really go anywhere, despite breakout performances in Quentin Tarantino’s movies.

So, it didn’t really kill anyone’s careers but it did ruin Batman’s popularity. While all of the Batman animated series were doing just fine, Batman didn’t appear on the big screen for 8 years after the movie came out and, that time, the franchise was rebooted with Batman Begins.

So, if anything, while the movie may not have killed any careers, it did kill the original Batman franchise.

Advertisements

Posted on September 17, 2016, in Movies, Super Heroes and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 80 Comments.

  1. Your central argument is that Batman and Robin didn’t kill anyone’s career and I can agree with that to the extent that a single movie rarely ever kills anyone’s career. Most actors and directors get to continue working even after a major flop. Most that don’t, it’s because they decided to pull the plug themselves. Batman and Robin definitely dealt critical blows to the careers of Silverstone, O’Donnell and Schumacher.

    Schumacher would continue directing, but he wasn’t going to be handed the keys to any more tentpole franchises. He seems to have spent most of his career since trying to atone for B&R.

    Silverstone was already going through a backlash after the success of Clueless. She would likely have imploded anyway, but B&R poured gasoline all over that fire. O’Donnell probably would have never gotten near the A-list if it weren’t for playing Robin in Batman Forever, so he has less to complain about.

    You left out two of the more interesting figures in this story. George Clooney has spent years apologizing for B&R but the movie was actually a turning point in his career. He made bank for playing Batman and since he was now a rich man, he decided never to do another movie for the money. His career has been richer for that decision. Schwarzenegger also had a big payday, but B&R continued a career slide that had already begun with The Last Action Hero.

    Like

    • ^Those are all good points.

      Also, while I did know Clooney has continued apologizing for this movie (too many times if you ask me), I didn’t know that it made him decide to never do another movie for the money.

      Like

      • Usually when the subject comes up, he just joke-apologizes. But when he was promoting Out of Sight, he talked about how the money he made from Batman and Robin enabled him to make the movies he wanted to make (like Soderbergh movies) without worrying about how they would perform at the box office. The flip side of that is someone like Nic Cage who didn’t manage his money well, so now he has to take every role that is offered to him. Being able to be selective is a huge advantage for an actor.

        Like

        • In Clooney’s case it also gives him the freedom to pursue personal projects such as Good Night, and Good Luck.

          Like

        • Absolutely. Which is why if I am ever offered the chance to play Batman, I will probably do it. 😉

          Like

        • ^True

          Like

        • If I’m not mistaken, George Clooney said while on “Inside the Actor’s Studio”, regarding how he ended up in “Batman & Robin”, he was of course, working on “ER” at the time, which like the Batman franchise, was a Warner Bros. property. The chief of Warner Bros. at the time (after Joel Schumacher told him that he wanted Clooney to be the next Batman) called him into his office and told him that he was the next Batman (or something that bluntly). I’m guessing Clooney in part took the role, because he knew it would raise his profile as a movie star and since Clooney has for the most part, a reputation for being a rather easy-going, charitable guy (unlike his predecessor Val Kilmer) was trying to be a “good little solider” for the studio.

          Like

        • I haven’t heard that story, but it wouldn’t surprise me. It was a good career move for him. He was still trying to establish himself as a movie star at the time. B&R did that.

          Like

      • Re: Are Superhero Films Good For Career?

        http://www.imdb.com/board/bd0000007/flat/261811156?d=261813127#261813127

        George Clooney managed to recover from his Batman film role, though. To his credit, I didn’t believe at the time, nor currently, that his portrayal of Batman was bad. Over-the-top could be said, but a different, more lighthearted and campy mood captivated 1990s Hollywood, when many of those superhero films were made. In the mid-2000s, the new gritty and more realistic (slightly, as far as superhero films could go) atmosphere had set itself up most prominently with Batman: Begins. I think post-Nolan Batman superhero films tend to be good for their actors and actresses, rather than a little before that period.

        Like

    • Joel Schumacher himself, can be considered kind of an enigmatic filmmaker in the sense that unlike say his fellow Batman directors, Tim Burton or Christopher Nolan, Schumacher really doesn’t have an immediately recognizable style Therefore, his audience more than likely, may not know what to expect or anything for a fanbase to seriously grab onto.

      To give you a better idea, Joel Schumacher has made musical comedies (D.C. Cab), yuppie coming of age dramas (St. Elmo’s Fire), horror movies (The Lost Boys, Town Creek), legal thrillers (The Client, A Time to Kill), melodramas (Dying Young, Flawless), documentary style war dramas (Tigerland), Tony Scott style action movies (Bad Company), Shyamalan style psychological dramas (Number 23), Broadway musical adaptations (Phantom of the Opera), violent thrillers (Falling Down, 8mm), and comic book movies (Batman Forever, Batman & Robin).

      As a result, people who like his edgier movies are going to be turned off by his mainstream blockbusters. People who like his genre movies are going to be turned off by his melodramas. He’s not an “auteur”; he’s not a name filmmaker.

      Maybe the reason his career has endured several flops was because he kept his mouth shut and does what his employers tell him to. Batman Forever and Batman & Robin were the studio’s vision; Schumacher just “realized” that version, which is what he was hired to do.

      Like

      • I wouldn’t mind Joel Schumacher himself getting a WTHHT article, because he’s the classic example of one bad movie (“Batman & Robin”) ruining a director’s reputation. I feel kind of bad for Schumacher, because for the most part, he seems like a genuinely nice man. And I’ll give him credit for being man enough to apologize (it’s hard to still be bitter over a movie that’s nearly 20 years old and has been successfully rebooted) for letting the Batman fans down.

        Like

        • I wouldn’t mind that either. To date, I haven’t written an entry on a director. Eventually, I figure someone will probably get around to that.

          Like

        • Somebody just told me on Facebook that Joel Schumacher during his peak (when he was making reliable hits for Hollywood), was arguably the poor man’s Rob Reiner. But movie tastes change and now both of them are considered passe. I suppose that “North” is pretty much Rob Reiner’s “Batman & Robin”.

          Like

        • Yeah, “North” was pretty much a disaster for Rob Reiner; from what I viewed of it I didn’t like it. I’ll stick with “The Sure Thing” or “Misery”.

          Like

        • Aside from having a string of hits followed by a string of flops, I don’t see the connection.

          Like

        • I’m cool with Schumacher; he directed “The Lost Boys”, so that’s all I need to know, and I think he’s had a solid directing career overall. That Batman deal was just a widespread failure that I wouldn’t pin on one individual.

          Like

        • I wouldn’t pin it on one individual. But I do pin a lot of it on Schumacher. He picked the cast and the Batnipples were his idea.

          Like

        • Like many others, I don’t care for the batnipples. Batnipples=bad.

          Like

    • With Alicia Silverstone and Chris O’Donnell, they were probably cases of actors who too peaked early (Silverstone w/ “Clueless” and O’Donnell w/ “Scent of a Woman”) and had trouble rebuilding their careers after “Batman & Robin”.

      I think that Alicia Silverstone was already making enemies because people felt that her handsome production deal w/ Columbia Pictures so early in her career (and only off of the back of “Clueless”) was unwarranted. And also, Silverstone probably really ill-equipped for her sudden stardom and had trouble graduating into more adult roles given her questionable range/choice or roles post-“Clueless”.

      Chris O’Donnell is a more unusual case. He theoretically could’ve stuck around in the limelight a bit longer, but he pretty much voluntarily bowed out to look after his young family. O’Donnell also made some crucial errors in judgement (that wouldv’e likely extended his time on the A-list) like turning down Will Smith’s role in “Men in Black”. Also, O’Donnell kind of had a boy-next-door charm about him and something like that is hard to maintain as you get older.

      Like

    • I do agree with the argument or notion that it was really “Excess Baggage” that did more harm to Alicia Silverstone’s career than “Batman & Robin”. Did “Batman & Robin” remotely hurt her, of course it did as Alicia was especially singled out (rightly or wrongly) for her shabby performance (i.e. her line-deliveries were flat and lacked confidence, she doesn’t have a British accent despite playing a character from the UK, she looked out of shape, etc.). Even w/o Silverstone in it, “Batman & Robin” had a multitude of other problems. Silverstone’s presence in it was just adding a little fuel to the flames of things to criticize about.

      With “Excess Baggage”, it was Alicia’s first big starring vehicle after “Clueless”, which made her a star (or at least, a star on the rise/Hollywood’s “It Girl”) and household name beyond the Aerosmith videos. Alicia was the producer for it and was responsible for many key ingredients like casting Benico Del Toro and Christopher Walken, etc. Unfortunately, as explained in her WTHHT, it was apparent that she was way over her head as a producer. She frequently clashed with the director over the script and would sometimes refuse to take direction.

      “Excess Baggage” was supposed to be released in late 1996, but got pushed to August ’97 due to production issues. Unfortunately, the timing couldn’t have been worse as it was in the middle of the “Batman & Robin” hate brigade being at a fever pitch.

      With her the criticism over her weight, her involvement in what would become the most notorious superhero movie of all time, and her vanity project bombing that same year, Alicia Silverstone immediately became radioactive (and a person that instead of laughing with like we did in “Clueless” we last at) and no longer cool.

      Like

      • Actors ruined by one bad movie

        http://www.looper.com/16492/actors-ruined-one-bad-movie/

        Alicia Silverstone in Batman & Robin (1997)

        Everyone within a six-mile blast radius of Gotham felt the career aftershocks of Joel Schumacher’s epically awful bomb Batman & Robin, but former Clueless darling Alicia Silverstone went from “Betty” to “Barney” faster than anyone. Her Razzie-winning turn as Batgirl to George Clooney’s begrudging Batman helped spoil the release of Excess Baggage (the poorly received crime-comedy that was supposed to be her big starring vehicle) and promptly turned 1995’s “It Girl” into 1997’s has-been. Although Silverstone received an Emmy nomination in 2003 for her short-lived ABC series Miss Match and appeared in Beauty Shop, Batman & Robin foiled her chance at lasting stardom.

        Like

    • ‘I knew I wanted Will Smith’: Men In Black director Barry Sonnenfeld reveals he tricked Chris O’Donnell into not taking leading role

      http://www.dailymail.co.uk/tvshowbiz/article-4669340/Chris-O-Donnell-tricked-turning-Men-Black.html

      Like

  2. Ironically despite being considerd worst batman clooney might have the best career out of all actors that played batman

    Like

    • Matters how you would define “best career”. He is one of those people that projects “I’m a movie star” wherever he goes. Not in a conceited way, just his nature. But in terms of box office Michael Keaton and Ben Affleck have had as much or more success. Keaton was already an established movie star when he became Batman. His career went into a lull after Batman, and if that was the end of it I’d put Clooney over him. But with his career catching fire again it call it a tossup at best. Ben Affleck has almost certainly had more big hits than Clooney. Clooney is great, but I guess what I’m saying is 3 of 6 live action Batman actors have well established, major careers outside that movie. The jury is still out on Bale.

      Like

      • Only Adam West spent the 70’s doing car shows. He gets my vote. 😉

        Like

      • Just looking at their overall body of work, I think all the actors who have played Batman since 1989 have had substantial film careers (heck, Christian Bale’s been working since he was a kid). I know Val Kilmer has fallen off the map (in this millennium, what left a mark for me is 2002’s “The Salton Sea”, his portrayal of John Holmes in 2003’s “Wonderland”, and his Gay Perry character in “Kiss Kiss Bang Bang”), but the Batman role is long down the list when I think of the roles of Val Kilmer (I probably think more about his part in The Great Frog Society sketch on SNL:-)

        Like

    • I think Bale has a far more interesting, varied, challenging catalogue of work than Clooney has.

      Like

      • That’s fair. Clooney doesn’t have an American Psycho on his filmography. But I generally find Clooney more fun to watch. Both have had fantastic careers. I’d say the Batman movies are not representative of Bale’s best work.

        Like

        • No, but they are the best Batman movies, such as they are.

          Like

        • No argument from me. That’s a low bar to cross. The Nolan Batman movies are, in my opinion, vastly over-rated. But nostalgia aside, they hold up better than the Burton and Schumacher Batmen. The less said about BVS, the better.

          Like

  3. clooney has had more hits then keaton and ben. clooney career never had that dip ben and keaton did clooney career is still strong. Money monster was a box office hit clooney is still strong. keaton was not really a box office draw before batman and all in all he never really was a huge box office draw he never had the commerical success clooney did.

    Like

  4. bale had hits outside batman,public enemies prestgue fighter american hustle and big short. But he is not a huge box office draw more respected actor with huge fan base. Which does not bother him since he prefers character driven roles opposed to popcorn films. Keaton had a comeback but is still not really considered a box office draws spotlight was a hit but more ensemble and birdman was his first leading hit in a while so the film making money cannot be attributed to his name alone Ben affleck is a box office draw but it would be foolish to say hes been more consistent then clooney it was not until the town where he was considerd a draw again . clooney overall has less flops in his filmography., Not a fan of clooney acting but i can admit he has impressive career. In my opinon bale was best batman though he is only batman actor i actualy like overall not a fan of kilmer affleck keaton and clooney .

    Like

  5. Good article; I’m always up for Batman material, even if this article focused more on the performers from “Batman & Robin”, a film that makes me a little cold around the heart and makes me stop right where I am, like another Mr. Freeze pun.

    Like

  6. with the exception of kilmer all the batman actors are currently doing good. bale is still appearing in hits besides batman, before ben put on the bat suit he was enjoy a career resurrection after the town ditto with keaton who was enjoying career comeback as well and clooney 2 oscars ( one for actiing one for producing argo) 4 oscar noms a slew of box office hits since batman. I would say him and ben are the only batman actors i can say where a list keaotn never was and is sitll not

    Like

  7. Bad choices did not help his career either. However take kevin bacon for example he had a bunch of flops post footloose but he started getting supporting in big hits like jfk that saved his career. Had kilmer been easy on set maybe at best he could have a bacon like career supporting roles in hits. Or he might been able to still get leads. Dillion perfect exmaple hes never been box office friendly but he had many leads over the years cause he was easy to work with.

    Like

    • I don’t know if it’s right or fair to compare Val Kilmer’s careers w/ Kevin Bacon’s or Matt Dillon’s since they to the best of my knowledge, weren’t given the chance to front-line a major, tentpole blockbuster like “Batman Forever”. Suggesting that Kilmer would’ve started getting supporting roles in big hits would’ve saved his career, is purely speculative. What’s not to say that had Val Kilmer stayed out of trouble that he still would’ve been able to get leading roles?

      Like

  8. i enjoyed batman and robin it was flawed but fun flick. not the best batman flick but not nearly as everyone made it out to be. clooney seems to only do blockbuster type films to cater the audience and advance his career then he does films he likes that might not be as marketable in box office. Basically clooney as with a lot of actors have a do one film for them one film for him motto. Even though clooney is viewed as a movie star it seems he always wanted to established himself as serious actor do films he likes.

    Like

    • I try to be lenient with films, and all sorts of art really, but I feel that “Batman & Robin” is a giant turd that makes a thud sound. I heard it was bad before I viewed it in the theater, so it washed down easy enough for me, but I’ll never defend it either. Now, “Batman Forever” I actually like, even though you can see the beginnings of that particular Batman franchise begin to curdle.

      Like

      • That’s similar to my experience. I know Batman Forever is almost as bad as Batman and Robin. They share a lot of the same DNA. The volume just got cranked up on B&R. I won’t watch either one of them today, but I kind of liked BF when it came out. I sat down for B&R having read the reviews. “How bad could it be?” was my mindset. I wasn’t prepared for the Bat credit card.

        Like

        • “Batman Forever” was caught in this weird conundrum, where it wanted to maintain the Gothic, dark psychology of the Tim Burton ones and at the same time, be a more colorful (both literally and figuratively), hyper-kinetic take in responses to all of the criticism of “Batman Returns” being too dark and inappropriate for young children. “Batman & Robin” has the same problem w/ balancing its tone, but it’s even more pronounced due a lazier script.

          Like

        • I believe the film has tonal issues, but again I think it goes to how a character was treated, and in this case it was Two-Face. Too much camp going on with him (when you already had a campy Riddler, which I was fine with and expected). If Two-Face was a bit more menacing, that would’ve been great.

          Like

        • I have been saying this for years. There’s a moment at the end of the movie where Jones actually flips the coin and does the multiple personality thing that is really Two Face’s entire shtick. If they had done that for the whole movie, it would have been a big improvement. Don’t try to out-manic Jim Carrey. Especially in the mid-nineties. You will fail and you will look stupid in the process.

          Like

  9. there are a lot of actors who have flops yet still find work because they are easy to work with. I can say all the blame should be lied in director. The studio wanted a more campy less dark tone in order to better market happy meals for McDonald . They fired burton had a new director and told him the theme they wanted. I enjoy alot joel work he just did what studio asked most of his other movies are not campy. the studio should be blamed for trying to make a more cartoonish batman. Although batman forever and batman robin not greatest batman flicks but guilty pleasure of mine.

    Like

  10. joel did have some hits post batman phone booth and phantom of opera. its unfair to he has not escaped underperformance of batman and robin.

    Like

    • Phone Booth was a hit, but a very modest one.

      Phantom was a bomb. A big one, in fact.

      Like

    • “Batman & Robin” in no doubt, seriously hurt Joel Schumacher’s credibility. You can argue that Schumacher was still technically, considered an A-list director for a few years after that until he made “The Number 23” w/ Jim Carrey.

      I don’t want to shoulder the entire blame on him, since I feel that there were too many cooks in the kitchen on “Batman & Robin” (and a serious lack of awareness of what the people really wanted from Batman), It’s just that now that I think about it, Joel Schumacher just seems like the quintessential workman-like director. In other words, he’s somebody who while not a renowned auteur, can tackle any genre or subject matter when asked, has a somewhat flashy/commercial visual style, and could deliver for the most part and reliable (if not blockbuster) box office results.

      Like

  11. I don’t know that I would call Batman and Robin “one of the worst movies ever made”. That makes it sound more interesting than it really is. I saw it, I’d say it left so little impression on me one way or another that I can barely remark on it. It was completely forgettable, but it’s not The Room or Plan 9 From Outer Space or Night of Lepus level bad. Hell, it wasn’t even as bad as Van Helsing.

    Like

  12. Wow. I didn’t expect there to be so many comments on this one. I think BATMAN AND ROBIN was just one bad choice among a series of bad choices for most involved. I think they kind of lost sight of what they each loved about movies and took certain movies for paychecks, which is not altogether a bad thing. People gotta work, but those choices in movies certainly didn’t do much good for anyone involved.

    Like

    • What especially makes “Batman & Robin” look bad is that “Batman: The Animated Series” (which is arguably, to this day, the definitive film or television adaptation of Batman) was still very popular and in the public’s consciousness. Therefore, it’s extremely ironic that an animated television series that’s primary target audience is presumably, children was much more sophisticated and mature in its story telling then the actual live-action Batman films from the same time period.

      One thing that really doomed “Batman & Robin” from the get-go was using Mr. Freeze’s “Heart of Ice” backstory while casting Arnold Schwarzenegger to play him. That particular story carries a lot of pathos and to have Arnold spout cheesy puns and one-liners (as if he was indulging in self-parody) while at the same time, grieving for his wife, just feels extremely irresponsible.

      Like

      • I’d take “Batman: The Animated Series” over any live action Batman film anytime.
        “Batman & Robin” had many errors, but yeah, wasting the possibility of the Mr. Freeze character (which still managed a decent moment or two in the film) was one of the bigger ones.

        Like

    • I wasn’t expecting such a strong response to this topic either. We’re over 60 comments. This morning, when I logged in, the article was in the top 10! Well done, Kev!

      Like

  13. shapehser in love was minor role. and good will hunting was more supporting role for ben.

    Like

    • It’s been a long time since I last saw it, but wasn’t Ben the third part of a love triangle in SIL? And his role in GWH would be considered a second lead. It’s not a standard supporting role, like the rest of their crew in the film. Part of the success of that movie stems from him, seeing as how he co-wrote it.

      Like

  14. In a critcally standpoint clooney and bale have had the most critical success both have won oscar been nominated bunch of times

    Like

  15. I do remember back in 1997 people where excited to hear clooney would be batman.Now after that film he gained a lot of backlash. I think film wise his breakthough role was a perfect storm. That movie was his first box office hit. It lead to other hit film.

    Like

  16. his screentime in shakespher was short. damon was lead in good will hunting., r

    Like

  17. all ben oscar noms and wins are not for acting. clooney and bale has had more acting noms .

    Like

  18. but in terms of critical success for acting bale and clooney has been reozined more for their actign then ben hence the acitng noms. if we are talking about an acting stand point clooney and bale acting has been more reconized. In my opnon ben is better director

    Like

  19. Supehero films where not that big in the 90s but after the success of first x men it paved the way for more superhero films. Xmen is what made the genre hip

    Like

  20. Would George Clooney have worked as Batman with a different director?

    http://officialfan.proboards.com/thread/551176/clooney-worked-batman-different-director

    Post by Mozenrath on 8 hours ago
    He’d be a good Bruce Wayne, but admittedly, he seems harder to picture as a good Batman, even though we’ve seen him play dangerous characters.

    Joel Shumacher was not a good fit for the task, but the biggest issue would probably be studio mandates to churn out a glorified toy commercial.

    Post by TWERKIN’ MAGGLE on 8 hours ago
    If he were motivated, but he pretty much slept through Batman and Robin. I could see him thinking he was above it.

    Post by Jackie Chan, The Chan of Steel on 8 hours ago
    Hard to say.

    Clooney, Uma Thurman and Alicia Silverstone were in this weird daze where they just seemed to read their lines soullessly. Especially Silverstone. She actually looked doped up in some scenes.

    Thurman was kind of entertaining as the histrionic geeky tree hugger before she transformed, so that might have been a director thing. The other two, I can’t tell if it was bad casting, sloppy work or really awful direction.

    Post by blackoutcreature on 6 hours ago
    While Schwarzenegger wouldn’t have been my first choice for Mr. Freeze, I really feel with a better director and script he could’ve pulled it off. What he needed to do was play the character more emotionless and distant, almost exactly like he played the Terminator. But Schumacher wanted a cackling and pun-spouting moron instead.

    Like

  21. Don’t Hate Me : Why I Love “Batman & Robin” (1997)

    http://hubpages.com/entertainment/Why-I-love-Batman-Robin-1997

    THE STELLAR CAST

    What kind of film allows you to watch George Clooney and Arnold Schwarzenegger together ? It is hard to believe that Mr. Clooney actually played Batman a long time ago. And it also feels like it was in a galaxy far far away. He made so many different films since then but perhaps never another big pure franchise money-maker like this one. He was still relatively new in Hollywood back then and it is interesting to see him try to be Batman. Curiosity alone makes it worth at least a watch. He is a very likable Bruce Wayne but a weak Batman (not very intimidating). I believe he would do a better job nowadays. I don’t think Schwarzenegger is miscast as Mr. Freeze but with better dialogue (less puns), his portrayal would be more appreciated today. He can be very menacing in the suit and some scenes with his wife are genuinely emotional. To me, he is always a joy to watch anyway. Uma Thurman, while gorgeous, is definitely overacting in many scenes but it is still an entertaining performance. The names on the poster makes this one a must-watch, even if it is only to witness the interactions of one of the most interesting cast ever assembled for a comic-book movie.

    Like

  22. Joel Schumacher apologizes for Batman & Robin

    http://www.looper.com/70085/joel-schumacher-apologizes-batman-robin/

    Batman & Robin, the follow-up to 1995’s Batman Forever, is widely considered one of the worst superhero films ever created. Twenty years after its release, director Joel Schumacher finally speaks out to admit that he made more than a few mistakes with the movie. 

    Speaking with Vice for an interview all about the 20th anniversary of Batman & Robin, Schumacher stated that he’s sorry about how terrible the final product is, and revealed that he had a gut feeling to not take on the project in the first place. 

    “You know, I just knew not to do a sequel. If you get lucky, walk away. But everybody at Warner Brothers just expected me to do one. Maybe it was some hubris on my part,” said Schumacher. “I never planned on being, that dreadful quote, “a blockbuster king” because my other films were much smaller and had just found success with the audience and not often with the critics, which is really why we wrote them. [But] after Batman & Robin, I was scum. It was like I had murdered a baby.”

    When asked to speak to viewers who were expecting something different from Batman & Robin, Schumacher stated: “They obviously had very high expectations after Batman Forever. But perhaps it was the more innocent world in comparison, I don’t know.” 

    But ultimately, Schumacher completely owned up to his missteps: “No one is responsible for my mistakes but me… [and] nobody never, ever forced me to make a decision I didn’t approve of.”

    Schumacher went on to compare the post-release experience with Batman & Robin to his work on 1985’s St. Elmo’s Fire, which was initially slammed by critics. According to the director, the film “didn’t get one single good review in the whole of the United States of America.” But after he realized people “still ended up seeing the movie,” he felt that he “didn’t need critical approval.” 

    “I was never a critic’s darling and that was freeing,” Schumacher said in regards to the poor Rotten Tomatoes score and the online vitriol targeted at Batman & Robin. “But look, I still apologize.”

    While it’s certainly refreshing to hear Schumacher’s side of the story, it likely won’t be enough to remove the bad taste Batman & Robin left in so many fans’ mouth. After all, the sequel was so bad it almost ended the entire film franchise.

    Like

    • I don’t know about the whole “Innocent World” deal; I mean, “Heaven’s Gate” was savaged pretty badly, and that was 1980 (plus, I think that film has redeeming qualities). It’s just that B&R was worse than a bad PB&J.

      Like

  23. How Batman & Robin Changed the Superhero Movie for the Better

    https://www.theatlantic.com/entertainment/archive/2017/06/batman-and-robin-20th-anniversary/530997/

    Twenty years ago, the George Clooney-starring comic-book sequel flopped with critics and audiences—and set Hollywood heroes on a new path.

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: