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What the Hell Happened to Skeet Ulrich?

Skeet Ulrich

In the mid-90’s Skeet Ulrich seemed like a likely candidate for heart-throb status and A-list stardom.  After making some noise in a couple of cult films, Ulrich was poised for success.  While few would deny the actor’s status as a heart-throb, movie stardom proved elusive.  These days, Ulrich has gone from dangerous teen to TV dad.

What the hell happened?

Ulrich isn’t Skeet’s actual last name. He was born Bryan Ray Trout. Skeet Trout doesn’t sound like a name that would work well on a movie poster does it?  The Ulrich part came from his first stepfather DK Ulrich, who was a NASCAR driver and team owner (no connection to Lars Ulrich, the drummer from Metallica, although that was the first person to leap to mind when I first heard about Skeet circa 1996). The “Skeet” parts comes from the nickname “Skeeter” his Little League Coach gave him, due to his small stature.

Ulrich was a sickly child who suffered from repeated bouts with pneumonia.  At the age of ten, his doctors discovered a cleft mitral valve and a hole in his ventricular wall which required open heart surgery.  Throughout his life, Ulrich has been defensive about the scar it left him.

Skeet Ulrich – Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles – 1990

Ulrich’s first acting appearances were as an extra in Weekend At Bernie‘s (no he didn’t play the corpse) and the original Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles.  Ulrich says the experience changed his life:

I was a marine biology student at the time. But that was the thing that sort of turned my head toward storytelling, watching how it unfolded and seeing the collaboration. It just became very interesting to me, and that kind of changed my whole mindset about life and career and… thank god. But yeah, I started out doing it for beer money when I was at UNC Wilmington, and then it wound up being a whole lot more.

While attending the University of North Carolina, Ulrich began building sets for the theater department.  This lead to a summer workshop run by playwright David Mamet.  Once he was bitten by the acting bug, Ulrich transferred to NYU and began performing with Mamet’s Atlantic Theater Company.

Skeet Ulrich – CBS Schoolbreak Special – 1994

Director Stacy Cochran noticed Ulrich during a stage production and cast him in the leading role in the 1994 CBS Schoolbreak Special “Same Difference”.  It was a classic tale of two teenagers with different backgrounds who fall in love and have to deal with their parents’ disapproval.

That connection proved useful when two years later, Cochran also cast Ulrich in the 1996 movie, Boys.  Roger Ebert called Boys a “low-rent dumbed-down version of Before Sunrise.”  When it bombed at the box office, it was a major blow to star Winona Ryder.  But at this point in his career, just getting cast in a movie as big as Boys was a win for Ulrich.

Skeet Ulrich – The Craft – 1996

Boys was just the start of a banner year for Ulrich.  Next up, he had a supporting role in the high school horror movie, The Craft.

Robin Tunney starred as the new girl in town who falls in with a a group of high school outcasts played by Fairuza Balk, Rachel True and Neve Campbell.  The girls turn to witchcraft as a way of solving their problems and getting revenge on tormentors. Ulrich played one of those tormentors, your typical narcissistic high school jock. Spoiler warning: he ends up paying dearly for it.

Ulrich got his big break thanks to an existing relationship with the lead actress:

I had known Robin Tunney prior to either of us working much in film, if at all. We’d met in New York—I was still at NYU—and we became friends. She lived in the East Village, and I lived just north of the East Village. I was off doing Bruce Beresford’s movie Last Dance, and I guess she had talked to Doug Wick, who produced The Craft, and said he should look at me for the part. So they flew me out, and I had a few days off from the other film, and I went to Doug’s house and read scenes with Robin.

At this point in his budding acting career, Ulrich wasn’t living the life of a movie star.  To save money, he pocketed his per diem.  Instead of getting his own place, he crashed with friends.

Despite mixed reviews, The Craft was a sleeper hit at the box office. It opened in the top spot and remained in the top ten for its entire theatrical run.  Since then, The Craft has gone on to develop a cult following. Plans for a remake have been rumored for a few years now.

Skeet Ulrich – Scream – 1996

Ulrich capped off his big year by reteaming with Craft costar Neve Campbell in Wes Craven’s comeback film, Scream.

Campbell played Sidney Prescott, a high school student whose mother had been murdered.  Rose McGowan costarred as Sidner’s best friend and Ulrich and Matthew Lillard played their boyfriends.  Drew Barrymore (the only actual movie star in the cast), had a heavily promoted cameo as an early victim.  Courtney Cox appeared as a TV reporter who takes an interest in a deputy played by her future real-life ex-husband David Arquette.  Jamie Kennedy stole several scenes as the film geek who is familiar enough with horror movie tropes to know what will happen next.

Ulrich was just coming off playing a messianic character in another movie and he said he had difficulty getting into the head of a deranged teenager (it probably didn’t help that he was in his mid-twenties at the time.  In order to prepare for the role, Ulrich did some research:

I was fortunate in that the hotel suite they gave me had two rooms, so I used one just to sleep, and the other one… I was 26, I think, when I made it, and I was playing a 17- or 18-year-old, so I went straight to the mall and bought every hard-rock poster and black lights and everything, and I turned the other room into Billy’s room. And I’d sit in there and just read about John Wayne Gacy and play the most satanic music I could find and just try and find him rather quickly in that environment. It was interesting. In my mind, it was a documentary about two high school serial killers, and that’s the way I approached it. I sort of negated any of the tongue-in-cheek humor of it in my mind. So when I finally saw it, I was blown away by what it was, and how terrifying it was, but also how funny it was.

Prior to Scream, the slasher movie craze of the 80’s had pretty much petered out.  Even Freddy and Jason were between gigs.  Writer Kevin Williamson set out to revive the genre with a self-aware script that balanced scares with laughter.  The movie succeeded beyond anyone’s wildest imagination.  Not only did Scream revive Craven’s flagging career, it also resuscitated the horror film genre, just as it was on its way to  direct-to-video purgatory.  But according to Ulrich, Scream almost didn’t get made:

There was a point early on where Miramax pulled the plug on it, and it took Wes cutting together that opening with Drew [Barrymore] and sending it to Bob and Harvey [Weinstein] to get them to let us keep going. So that movie was so close to not even happening, and we were in Napa Valley feeling like some independent film. We shot, I think, five weeks of nights to start. It was so much fun and yet so dark at the same time, both literally and figuratively.

Scream received mostly positive reviews.  Ultimately, it was a hit at the box office.  But it didn’t exactly start out that way.  Harvey Weinstein insisted on releasing Scream during the Christmas movie season.  He argued that since horror movies were never released during this season, that the target audience wouldn’t have any other alternatives.

Neve Campbell and Skeet Ulrich – Scream – 1996

In its opening weekend, Scream grossed roughly $6 million dollars which was considered a disappointment.  Traditionally horror movies dropped about 50% in their second weekend.  That would put Scream on a path to failure.  But Scream didn’t drop 50%.  Instead, it became a word-of-mouth hit.  For the next few weeks, Scream‘s box office take increased ultimately grossing over $100 million dollars in the US.

Dimension couldn’t wait to capitalize on their success.  They rushed out a sequel the following year, but Ulrich’s character wasn’t coming back for any of the follow-ups.  That meant that if he was going to capitalize on the success of Scream, he was going to have to do so without the benefit of a franchise.

Skeet Ulrich – Albino Alligator – 1997

Ulrich opened 1997 with a supporting role in the crime drama, Albino Alligator.  Matt Dillon and Gary Sinise played brothers who participate in a hold-up gone wrong. When a police officer is killed, they retreat to a bar where they take hostages.  Faye Dunaway and Viggo Mortensen costarred.

Albino Alligator received a limited release in just a dozen theaters and was greeted by mixed reviews. Today, it is best-known for having been Kevin Spacey’s directorial debut.

Bridget Fonda and Skeet Ulrich – Touch – 1997

Later that, Ulrich starred in Paul Schrader’s adaptation of Elmore Leonard’s novel, Touch.

Ulrich played  a miracle worker who heals the sick and suffers from stigmata.  Christopher Walken played an ex-evangelist who encourages a character played by Bridget Fonda to get close to Ulrich and push him into the spotlight.  Tom Arnold appears as a fundamentalist who objects to Ulrich and Fonda’s relationship.

Touch was the movie Ulrich filmed right before he made Scream.  Like Albino Alligator, it received a limited release early in the year when studios burn off movies they don’t really believe in.

Skeet Ulrich – As Good as It Gets – 1997

Towards the end the year, Ulrich played a supporting part in James L Brooks’ comedy, As Good As It Gets.  Jack Nicholson and Helen Hunt both won Oscars for playing a mismatched couple.  Nicholson starred as a misanthropic author who suffers from obsessive–compulsive disorder.  Hunt portrayed a single mom who works as a waitress at a restaurant Nicholson frequents.

The supporting cast included Greg Kinnear as a gay painter who lives in the same building as Nicholson.  Ulrich appeared as a hustler who starts a relationship with Kinnear’s character.  The part was originally larger, but according to Ulrich a lot of his scenes ended up on the cutting room floor:

There was a whole relationship that developed between Greg Kinnear’s character and mine. And [James L. Brooks’s] first cut of the film was nearly five hours long. I had to fly out to do looping, and Jim met me in the parking lot and told me what happened, and I was crestfallen. He was remiss about it, because we spent a long time making that movie, and I was there for most of it, and to know that there was going to be very little of what I’d done in it… But he gave me the painting that Greg supposedly does in the film.

As Good As It Gets was a critical and commercial hit.  Had Ulrich’s scenes been left in tact, it could have been a big boost to his career.  But since he was barely in the final cut, all he got out of the movie was the painting which he says he gave to his mom.

Skeet Ulrich – the Newton Boys – 1998

In 1998 Ulrich teamed up with Matthew McConaughey, Ethan Hawke, Vincent D’onofrio and Dwight Yoakam for Richard Linklater’s 1920’s-set crime film The Newton Boys.  McConaughey played the elder son of a farmer who convinces his brothers to give up the family business and start robbing banks.

Ulrich said the movie was difficult for Linklater who wasn’t used to working within the studio system.  But the cast got along very well and had quite a bit of fun making the movie.  It was while filming The Newton Boys that Matthew McConaughey was arrested for dancing naked and playing the bongo drums.

Although I personally enjoyed it quite a bit, The Newton Boys received mixed reviews and under performed at the box office.  It barely cracked the top ten when it opened with a 9th place debut behind U.S. Marshals which had been in theaters for four weeks.

Cuba Gooding Jr. and Skeet Ulrich – Chill Factor – 1999

Up to this point, most of Ulrich’s performances have been in ensemble and supporting parts. In 1999, he made an attempt at a leading man part.

Chill Factor was an action-thriller that teamed Ulrich with Cuba Gooding Jr.  One of the reasons Ulrich took the part was the opportunity to hang out with his costar:

Cuba [Gooding Jr.] and I had, like, 12 scenes cut out of As Good As It Gets, so he and I had worked together on that. And he’s one of the funniest human beings I’ve ever been around. So that experience was a blast. I could not wait to leave set every day, my stomach hurt so bad from laughing all day long. So it was a great time and, you know, there are a lot of people who really like that movie. I don’t necessarily see why, but they do.

Unfortunately, lightning didn’t strike twice as Chill Factor bombed. It opened in 6th place at the box office behind the remake of The Thomas Crown Affair which had been in theaters for more than a month.  Both critics and audiences said “no thanks”.  Three years after Scream, Ulrich still hadn’t capitalized on that movie’s success.

Skeet Ulrich and Tobey Maguire – Ride with the Devil – 1999

Later that year, Ulrich appeared in Ang Lee’s Civil War drama, Ride With The Devil.

Ulrich played a man whose father was killed by Union soldiers.  Tobey Maguire costarred as Ulrich’s friend who follows him when he joins the Bushwhackers, an informal group that fought for the South.  When the group takes refuge on the property of a sympathetic family, Ulrich becomes romantically involved with a young widow played by world-renowned poet and yodeler, Jewel.  Maguire ends up befriending a freed slave played by Jeffrey Wright which causes him to question the righteousness of the Confederacy.

Ulrich was disappointed by the way the movie’s release was handled:

It’s really the only unseen Ang Lee movie. October Films was our original distributor, and he had just won for Sense And Sensibility. It was a seven-month shoot, and during the shoot, October Films was bought by USA Films, and their first release was The Muse, with Sharon Stone, and Ride With The Devil was supposed to be their second release. And they became so terrified. I mean, the film is multi-themed, but the whole notion that there was a black Confederate soldier scared the shit out of them, so they let it out for four days and then shelved it. And [Lee] went off to make his next film, and Ride With The Devil just kind of went away.

Reviews were mixed.  Several influential critics complained that the movie was boring.  Roger Ebert compared it to a history class while Entertainment Weekly called it “unengaging”.  Ride With the Devil never received a wide release.  It played in at most 60 theaters and peaked at 50th at the box office.  It grossed just over $600,000 with a $38 million dollar budget!

As the decade came to an end, Ulrich decided to focus more on spending time with his family.  In 1997, he had married English actress Georgina Cates.  They had a small ceremony on farmland Ulrich had purchased in Virginia.  In 2001, the couple welcomed a pair of twins.  Ulrich continued working, but his film roles have been in movies that received either a very limited theatrical release or went straight to video.

Skeet Ulrich – Miracles – 2003

However, he has found a place for himself on TV.

In 2003, Ulrich starred in the short-lived thriller, Miracles, on ABC.  The show was a supernatural take on The X-Files with Ulrich as a former investigator for the Catholic Church.  The show was executive produced by David Greenwalt who had experience with this sort of thing on Buffy the Vampire Slayer and its spin-off show, Angel.

ABC pulled the plug on Miracles after airing only six episodes.  Fans sent the network messages written on napkins (which makes sense if you have seen the show’s pilot), but ultimately it wasn’t enough to save the show.

Skeet Ulrich – Jericho – 2006-2008

In 2006, Ulrich was at it again in the post-apocalyptic drama, Jericho.  Ulrich starred as one of the residents of a small town in Kansas following a nuclear attack on several major cities in the US. Jericho was cancelled after its first season which resulted in another campaign by fans who wanted to save the show.  This time fans sent in over 20 tons of nuts to the network (a reference to events from the first season finale.

The effort paid off in the form of a second season, but low ratings continued to plague the show.  The second season finale was shot with two endings; one a cliffhanger in case the show got picked up for a third season and one that offered Jericho‘s fans closure.  They ended up airing the latter when the show was cancelled a second time.

According to Ulrich, Jericho just wasn’t a good fit for the network it was on:

It wasn’t a show that was a CBS-type show. Now they have their summer miniseries that are sort of similar to it, but they had never really stepped outside of cops and lawyers and doctors, and they were scared of it…

The thing that killed that show was the marketing strategy that they had for it. Lost was in its fourth season when they split it into basically two 11-episode half-seasons, with a three-month hiatus in between the 11th and 12th episodes. But they had four seasons, and they had a following, and they did a massive amount of marketing when they broke between the 11th and 12th to let people know when it was coming back.

And CBS wanted to use that model of marketing for Jericho. And it killed it.  I mean, we had a big fan base, but they didn’t do the marketing to let people know when it came back, and then when the numbers dropped, they blamed us.

Skeet Ulrich – Jericho – 2006-2008

After the show was finally cancelled for good, fans continued trying for a revival.  There was some interest from Netflix which had brought back shows like Arrested Development, but ultimately a deal could not be struck:

We were close [to a third season] about four or five years ago. Karim Zreik, one of the producers, called me and said, “Netflix has a schedule, they have budget, they have locations. Are you in?” I said, “Absolutely, with one proviso: That first script back has to time-jump five years, and the world has devolved way lower than we could ever have imagined.” And they were on board with it. And CBS wouldn’t sell it. The deal wouldn’t work for them.

Jericho continues to have a cult following.  The story has continued on in comic book form.

Skeet Ulrich – Law & Order: LA – 2010-2011

Starting in 2010, Ulrich played Detective Rex Winters on Law & Order.  His character debuted in an episode of Law & Order: Special Victims Unit.  Ulrich was then cast as the lead on Law & Order: LA which ran from for just one season.  Part way through the first season, Ulrich’s character was killed off as part of a creative shake-up.  In a move that left viewers scratching their heads, episodes were aired out of sequence.

Ulrich didn’t enjoy his time on the show which he described as “one of the least creative experiences I’ve ever had.”  He blamed his firing on network politics:

The only time I’ve ever been fired in the 27 years I’ve been doing this, and the reasons were just nebulous. It had a bit to do with [Bob] Greenblatt’s takeover, coming from Showtime to NBC and wanting to make his mark, and Dick Wolf’s love/hate relationship with NBC. There was a lot going on at the upper echelon that had nothing to do with the day-to-day of making that show and the results of it. And the only comeuppance I had is that they lost six million viewers after I was killed. And I was laughing on a beach in Italy when I heard.

Skeet Ulrich – Riverdale – 2017

In addition to recurring roles, Ulrich has appeared in several TV movies and guest spots on shows like CSI: NY and Unforgettable.  Most recently, he’s gone to the CW show Riverdale. The show is based on the Archie comics, but unlike the squeaky clean source material, Riverdale is dark and sexy.  The show’s first season focused on a murder mystery in which Ulrich’s character was a prime suspect.  The tone of the show is Archie by way of Twin Peaks.

Ulrich plays Forsythe “FP” Jones, Jughead’s estranged father.  Several of the parents on the show are played by actors with a background in coming-of-ages movies and TV shows.  Archie’s parents are played by Luke Perry and Molly Ringwald.  And Mädchen Amick from Twin Peaks plays Betty’s mom.  Ulrich says he is excited to be involved in the show:

The way he approached it, I was blown away by the writing and the skill of it, and then when I saw the pilot, even more so. So I jumped at the opportunity. They initially went, “Would you do three with the potential of doing more?” I said, “Yeah, sure!” And then it just kept growing. And now I get to go do a bunch of them.

The hit CW show was recently renewed for a second season with Ulrich promoted to a member of the regular cast.

So, what the hell happened?

In this case, the answer should be pretty obvious. While Skeet did (and still does have) fans, he was never a major box office draw. He was in films that were successful critically and commercially and a couple that have become cult favorites. But he was never the primary reason people went to those movies.

After Scream, Ulrich had a narrow window in which to establish himself as a movie star.  But it was a crowded field for young actors in the late 90’s.  Even within his own movie, Ulrich faced competition from costar Matthew Lillard.  Scream spawned knock-offs like I Know What you Did Last Summer which minted potential movie stars like Freddie Prinze Jr. and Ryan Phillippe.  Just as the teen horror craze was dying out due to over-saturation, the high school romcoms launched more potential rivals for Ulrich like Heath Ledger.

For the most part, Ulrich (who was 26 when he made Scream) sidestepped the high school roles.  He can be credited for seeking out parts in prestige pictures like As Good As It Gets and Ride With the Devil.  Unfortunately those choices didn’t pay off as Ulrich’s part got cut from As Good As It Gets and Ride With the Devil turned out to be one of Ang Lee’s least-watched movies.  But at least Ulrich can say he didn’t take the easy way out by starring in a bunch of Scream knock-offs.

After his attempt at establishing himself as a leading man in movies failed, Ulrich took a step back and started a family.  He rebuilt his career on TV.  Despite several setbacks, he’s currently a regular on a hit show.  That’s a reasonably happy ending for a WTHH article.

What The Hell Happened Directory

 

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Posted on July 20, 2017, in Movies, TV, What the Hell Happened?, WTHH Actor and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 15 Comments.

  1. Cool writeup for what you brought here to Ulrich. It’s good to see some new WTHH articles coming back.

    Like

    • What ever happened to Skeet Ulrich?

      http://www.nickiswift.com/55007/ever-happened-skeet-ulrich/

      Skeet Ulrich made a name for himself in 1996’s Scream, and over the next few years, he starred in a handful of movies that seemed poised to make him an A-list name. After hitting the big screen in As Good as It Gets and The Newton Boys, his rise to fame seemed to take a detour into more obscure roles. What happened, and where is he now?

      The ill-fated fan favorite, Jericho

      In 2006, Ulrich signed on to take the lead role in the CBS apocalypse drama Jericho and when he did, he told TV Guide he should have known better. “My work on Miracles should have told me to steer clear of doing another show,” he said. “Doing one is so intense, it typically becomes a 70-hour week.” For Ulrich, the promise of being near his then-kindergarten-age twins Jakob and Naiia was enough to tip the scales back toward television.

      Those 70-hour weeks were worth it, though, and Jericho became something of an immediate cult hit with a dedicated following. Unfortunately, it wasn’t enough to keep the show from getting the axe not once, but twice. After it was cancelled the first season, fans took one of Ulrich’s lines — “Nuts.” — and ran with it, sending millions and millions of nuts to CBS executives in a plea to have their show given another chance. Even that dedication couldn’t save it in the end, though, and it was cancelled for good in 2008. According to ScreenRant, though, there’s been some rumors about the possibility of the show being revived, and Netflix was in talks to bring it back in 2013. Nothing came of it, but the story briefly continued in graphic novel form. That, too, gradually stopped.

      Ulrich hasn’t said whether or not he’d be on board with a revival, but he did tell TV Guide there had been something about the story that had pulled him back to television. “I really loved the premise. Who do we become when someone takes everything away? Who decides what is law and order in a new world?”

      He’s started popping up at conventions

      For an entire generation of fans whose horror movie experiences started with Scream’s reenvisioning of the stalker film, Skeet Ulrich is always going to be an ultimate bad guy. He’s always going to be associated with that creepy mask, and if there’s anything else horror fans love, it’s conventions. Ulrich made his convention debut at the 2015 Texas Frightmare Weekend, and he took the opportunity to answer some fan questions, including one from Movie Pilot. Asked what his own favorite scary movie was, he quipped, “The Princess Bride. No, really, it is!” Moving on to a more serious answer, he said, “The Exorcist is my favorite. There’s something about religious horror and the fact that it’s a true story that just terrified me when I saw it. It’s hard to watch.”

      Ulrich’s appearance wasn’t just a one-time deal, either, and he was also on the roster for the 2016 Texas Frightmare Weekend, alongside names like Robert Englund and Mitch Pileggi. He was participating in a Wes Craven Memorial Panel, delighting genre fans by embracing that role that made him famous.

      He continued his television curse with Law & Order

      When Collider spoke with Ulrich about his 2010 foray into one of television’s longest-running franchises, they asked him if getting involved with a longterm mainstay like Law & Order was a conscious departure from some of the perceived risks he had taken with Miracles and Jericho in the years leading up to his stint as Detective Rex Winters.

      “No, to me, it’s a character I haven’t had the chance to delve into,” he told them. “I tend towards characters for a modicum of reasons. This is a walk of life I hadn’t stepped into and I’m fascinated by it.”

      That’s not to say that he hadn’t been on cop dramas before, though, and he had done a bit on CSI: NY playing, again, a serial killer — for the first time since Scream. Ulrich took his research for his Law & Order role incredibly seriously, too, shadowing LA’s real-life Homicide Division in preparation. He also told Collider it was an up close and personal look at just how tough the job of a cop on the street really was, and recounted a run-in with four women who had approached the police blockade to find out how long they were going to be there. When they responded that the street was going to be closed off by police presence for the whole night, the women were relieved they would finally be able to sleep through the night.

      “Suddenly, it hit me so hard what these guys do,” Ulrich said. “There is a palpable gratefulness to those who are not crime committers, if you will, for this force.” Unfortunately, Ulrich’s dedication wasn’t enough to break his curse. Losing almost 50 percent of viewers in the first three weeks, the show was cancelled after a single season and his character was killed off (via TV Series Finale).

      He’s had random appearances on Robot Chicken

      Ulrich didn’t actually appear on-screen, of course, but he did lend his voice to Robot Chicken for a series of episodes that spanned 2007 to 2014. While he played a number of random characters that included Brainy Smurf from the 2014 episode “Batman Forever,” he was also featured at least semi-regularly playing Duke of the GI Joe fame.

      His personal life has been up and down, too

      Off the screen, Ulrich has never really had it easy, either. When he talked to LA Mag in 2010, they touched on his childhood. “I didn’t really have a dad,” he said, referring to his parents’ split when he was six. Not only did they split, but his father kidnapped both him and his brother and took them on a three-year road trip, trying to stay ahead of the law. Eventually, he was reunited with his mother, and his father was never heard from again. “I had a lot boiling inside of me. As [playwright David] Mamet said, ‘If you didn’t want to be an actor, you should have had a good childhood.'”

      As for his own family life, it’s been pretty turbulent. He married actress Georgina Cates and moved to a 500-acre home in Virginia, but the pair split in 2002. Even though they shared custody of their two children, he made headlines of the unflattering sort in 2013 when Radar Online claimed to have gotten a hold of some documents that claimed he owed more than $280,000 in child support payments.

      With the end of that relationship, Ulrich married actress Amelia Jackson-Gray. Unfortunately for him, that marriage ended in divorce as well, in 2015 (via MSN).

      He saddled up in 2014

      Between 2001 and 2014, Ulrich was only in two movies that had theatrical releases, and it was after that dry spell that he hopped in the saddle for 2014’s 50 to 1. The film told the story of the 2009 Kentucky Derby, and the completely unexpected victory of longshot Mine that Bird. According to what Ulrich told the Charlotte Observer, there were some unexpected difficulties in filming.

      “Thoroughbreds bite,” he told reporters. “I’d been around quarter horses, and we got along fine, but thoroughbreds are temperamental.”

      Somewhat ironically, Ulrich was playing the Derby winner’s trainer, Chip Woolley. While the movie might have slipped under the radar for many people, Ulrich says there was just something about the story he knew he wanted to be a part of. “I’m not offered the movies I once was, and it’s hard to find one creatively that’s appealing,” he said honestly. “50 to 1 was one I fought for and was fortunate enough to get.”

      While he says both mediums have their benefits — movies give more prep time, while television story arcs can be longer and more complicated — he also says he was drawn to the film because the real-life Woolley was someone he could completely respect. “He likes to party; he’d have drinks with us, and we’d stumble out of a bar at 1 — but he’d have to be up at 4:30 to take care of his animals. That preparation and work ethic, whether you’re a golfer or a trainer or an actor, is everything.”

      He’s dabbled in directing

      In 2014, Ulrich released a short film that was not only his directorial debut, but also a family project. The Girl on the Roof starred his daughter, Naiia Ulrich, and was written by his then-wife, Amelia Jackson-Gray. Broadway World took a look at the impressive list of awards the film accumulated, including honors like Best Short at the Catalina Film Festival and at ITVFest, as well as gaining honors for Jackson-Gray, who also played the film’s nanny.

      Other reviews of the project were favorable, too, with Nerdgeist wondering why he didn’t take more opportunities to direct, as he appeared to be a natural. The story is the tale of an introverted young girl who wanders through a shady, shady world — and it’s one that also stars Lennie James. Ulrich’s success in the director’s chair remains to be seen, but if popular opinion holds any weight, it seems to be something people definitely want to see more of.

      He’s playing the dad now

      In October 2016, E! News broke the story that both he and fellow 90s heartthrob Luke Perry were going to be guest starring in the CW drama Riverdale. At the time, it wasn’t entirely clear just what their relationship was going to be to the beloved characters of the Archie comics, but they did know he was going to be the head of a criminal gang called the Southside Serpents, that he was going to show up in the fourth episode, and that he was going to hold a special sort of grudge against Perry. They also pointed out how similar he looks to Cole Sprouse, who’s playing Jughead… and they were right.

      Hollywood Life talked to Sprouse about Ulrich’s appearance on the show, and his casting as Jughead’s father. “He and I are two peas in a pod,” Sprouse said. “It’s insane casting. They really nailed it!”

      The Hollywood Reporter chatted a bit with the show’s creators, and they said casting former teen stars for the adult roles was exactly what they had been going for. Ulrich and Perry are joined by Molly Ringwald and Robin Givens, and it’s all in the hopes of reaching a second audience. While they’re playing to the CW’s usual audience with their teen stars, they’re also reaching out to those who have connected with the older generation of actors when they were young.

      “I pushed for anyone who had ever played a teenager on film or television to come in,” said showrunner Sarah Schechter. The dynamic was also designed to allow them to focus on adult issues as much as teen ones, and given Ulrich’s tendency to gravitate toward deep characters, it’s safe to say that there’s going to be more to him than a one-dimensional background character.

      He’s heading back to horror roots

      Ulrich got his start in horror, and in spite of the fact that he actually doesn’t really play a serial killer all that often, that’s what many see him as — for better or worse. In 2016, The Hollywood Reporter revealed he was going back to his horror roots and hopefully back to the big screen with a film called Escape Room.

      With real escape rooms — locked rooms where players have to solve puzzles to find their way out — only increasing in popularity, it was a logical choice for the basis of a horror movie. Ulrich stars as the owner of an escape room, but there’s a catch: inside the room is a demon.

      While the story suggested the movie, then in post-production, was being shopped with the goal of bringing it to theaters complete with social media and mobile game tie-ins, more word on what’s going on with the movie has been scarce. The news is frustrating, another delay in the up-and-down career of this ’90s heartthrob who helped make horror was it is today.

      Like

      • What Happened to Skeet Ulrich – News & Updates

        http://gazettereview.com/2017/01/happened-skeet-ulrich-news-updates/

        Born on January 20, 1970, in Lynchburg, Virginia, Skeet Ulrich (Real name: Bryan Ray Trout)’s parents divorced when he was just three years old. Growing up, he was raised majorly by his mother Carolyn Wax Rudd, the owner of a marketing agency called the Sports Management Group, and his step-father D.K. Ulrichーa NASCAR driver.

        Although he took on his last name, his mother has since remarried to a man named Edward Lewis. As a young boy, Ulrich was quite frail and often ill; not only did he face many bouts of pneumonia but he also underwent open-heart surgery for a ventricular septal defect at the tender age of ten. Noted for his small stature, Ulrich was referred to as “Skeetcher” by his Little League coach, a moniker which he eventually adapted into his professional stage name.

        Following his graduation from Northwest Cabarrus High School in the late 1980’s, he enrolled at the University of North Carolina, where he studied Marine Biology; prior to completing the program however, he transferred to New York University. Around that time, Ulrich began studying acting at an off-Broadway theatre known as the Atlantic Theater Company. One day while honing his craft in class, he captured the attention of director, Stacy Cochran, who happened to be present. Recognizing his on-screen potential, she soon offered him a small role in her series, CBS Schoolbreak Special (1994). Although it wasn’t Ulrich’s first time appearing on televisionーas he had appeared in two uncredited roles a few years backーit served as his official small screen debut. From there, the aspiring actor eventually appeared in The Craft (1995), and Last Dance (1996). With Cochran’s help, he later landed his first notable role in the movie, Boys (1996) where he played alongside award-winning actress, Winona Ryder. That same year, he also received his first starring role in the popular slasher film, Scream (1996).

        Skeet Ulrich’s Early Acting Career

        In the winter of 1996, Ulrich landed his first major role in Kevin Williamson’s Scream. Based loosely on the Gainesville Ripper, it centered around a student who finds herself becoming the target of a mysterious killer known only as “Ghostface”. While the part of said teenager went to Casey Becker, the actor played the part of another main lead by the name of Billy Loomisーan avid horror movie fan who eventually becomes a suspect of the gruesome killings; while the suspicions around him eventually dispel, he soon falls victim to Ghostface himself.

        Screened nation-wide in theaters on December 20, 1996 after an initial premiere in Los Angeles, the slasher proved to be a critical success; over 1400 theatres, it took in more than $6.3 million in its opening weekend, ranking second only behind Beavis and Butt-head Do America (1996). Met with critical acclaim, Scream garnered numerous positive reviews from critics including those from The Los Angeles Times, the San Francisco Chronicle and the Chicago Sun-Times. A massive blockbuster, it later went on to gross over $173 millionーa huge amount compared to its production budget of $14 million. The winner of an MTV Movie Award and a Saturn Award for the category of “Best Horror Movie”, Scream also garnered Ulrich a Saturn Award nomination for “Best Supporting Actor” in 1996.

        The following year, Ulrich returned to the big screen in James L. Brook’s romantic comedy, As Good as it Gets (1997). Based on a story by Mark Andrus, it centered around a relationship between three distinctly different individualsーa gay artist, a single mother, and a misanthropic novelist, all whose lives happen to cross paths with one another in the film. While Ulrich didn’t play either one of the three main leads (they were played by Greg Kinnear, Helen Hunt and Jack Nicholson respectively), he still received a fair amount on-screen time as Vincent Lopianoーa secondary character which appears later in the movie.

        Joining him in the supporting role were Cuba Gooding, Jr., Julie Benz, Shirley Knight and Jesse James. Another winter release, As Good as it Gets was theatrically released on December 23, 1997. Quickly becoming a box office hit, it grossed over $12.6 million in its opening weekend, ranking only behind Tomorrow Never Dies (1997), and Titanic (1997). Given favorable reviews by many professional critics, it received dozens of awards, including an Oscar for the “Best Picture-Music or Comedy” category; it has since been included in Empire Magazine’s list of “500 Greatest Movies of All Time.” Although the comedy flick didn’t earn Ulrich any particular awards per se, it ended up being one of the biggest box office hits of his early career.

        Highlights from Skeet Ulrich’s Continued Acting Career

        Branching out to television, Ulrich appeared as a main lead in the ABC drama, Miracles in 2003. The brainchild of Michael Petroni and Richard Hatem, the series have been regarded by the creators themselves as a “spiritual version of The X-Files.” Originally premiered on January 27, 2003, the show starred the actor as Paul Callanーan investigator of modern miracles who begins questioning his faith after finding unremarkable explanations for a variety of supposed phenomena; after he himself is later saved by a supernatural miracle, he is frustrated to know that his claims are dismissed without a second thought by others due to a lack of evidence.

        Featuring a varied cast, Miracles also starred Angus Macgadyen, Marisa Ramirez, Hector Elizondo and Jacob Smith. Upon its release, the series was fairly well-received; during its first season, it attracted an average of 8.7 million viewers. Despite its rapidly-growing fan base and the fact that the show was later nominated for a Primetime Emmy Award, Miracles was cancelled by the network after only six episodes due to low ratings. Nonetheless, it successfully established a following for Ulrich, who played Paul Callan in the series.

        Starring in yet another television series, Ulrich portrayed the principal character in the CBS post-apocalyptic drama, Jericho (2006). Set in a fictional Kansas town called Jerichoーas its name impliesーthe show followed its citizens in the aftermath of a nuclear attack. Released on September 20, 2006, it featured Ulrich as Jake Greenーa 32-year-old man who heads back into town after a five year absence to claim his inheritance; as he sets off to return home however, he finds himself in the middle of the calamity. Boasting a large ensemble cast, Jericho also included appearances from Lennie James, Ashley Scott, Kenneth Mitchell, Michael Gaston and Gerald McRaney.

        Filmed in the neighborhood of Van Nuys, California, it attracted over nine million viewers during its first season; the figure eventually dropped to six million in the subsequent episodes. A fan-favourite, Jericho garnered many loyal audience members, many of whom praised the show for being a splendid mixture of mystery, science fiction and drama. Nominated for a Primetime Emmy Award in 2008, it ultimately continued for two years prior to being cancelled in March 2008 after 29 episodes. Along with Miracles, Jerichoーas many fans would agreeー snags the title of being one of Ulrich’s most remembered portrayals on television.

        Since then, the actor has guest starred in several TV shows including CSI: NY (2009), Law & Order: Special Victims Unit (2010), and Unforgettable (2015). In 2010, he also reprised his character of Detective Rex Winters in Law & Order: LA, in which he appeared in fourteen episodes. In terms of film, he has been involved with three projects over the past couple of yearsー50 to 1 (2014), and Lost in Austin (2015).

        What’s Skeet Ulrich Doing Now in 2017 – Recent Updates

        casa-matusitaFrom the looks of it, Ulrich will be making many appearances on both the big and small screens in 2017. One of the projects that he’s been working on is the thriller, The Mystery of Casa Matusita. Starring Catalina Sandino Moreno, Tyler Young, Malcolm McDowell, and Bruce Davison, it will center around a husband and wife couple who encounters bizarre events after moving into the allegedly haunted “Casa Matusita” in Peru.

        Besides the horror flick, he will also be appearing in an upcoming comedy film called Lost in Austin (2017) alongside Linda Cardellini, Kristen Schaal and Jaime Pressly. Recently completed, it will be making its way to theatres sometime in 2017ーalthough no official release date has been announced. Aside from the two already-mentioned movies, Ulrich will also be appearing in a movie called Escape Room (2017) and a TV film called Stay (2017).

        Like

      • Skeet Ulrich FIRED From Law & Order: LA!

        https://www.datalounge.com/thread/10045163-skeet-ulrich-fired-from-law-order-la!

        Ulrich is an underrated actor who doesn’t get credit for his realistic and subtle performances because people now a days seem to think that running around the screen and screaming at the scenery, eating it all up, is somehow good acting (see: Terrence Howard, Keifer Sutherland and most actors on TV). He was strong in Jericho, Miracles – one of the best shows ever to air on television, CSI NY, and though he had a small role in Armored, his performance stood out.

        It becomes easy to call someone wooden when the majority of people think that melodramatic soap opera antics constitutes good acting.

        —chris

        reply 79 12/07/2011

        Like

        • What Happened? Celebrities Who Should Have Had Bigger Careers

          http://madamenoire.com/285747/what-happened-celebrities-who-should-have-had-bigger-careers/9/

          Skeet Ulrich
          Everyone thought that this 90’s cutie had a bright future ahead of him. With roles in The Craft and Scream, Ulrich definitely knew how to charm the ladies and had this awesome swagger to him. But somewhere along the line, Ulrich’s career seemed to stall out. He tried to break into TV, but most of his forays never really amounted to much. He’s adorable, he’s got the whole strong, silent type thing going on, so we ask: What happened here?

          Like

        • ENTERTAINMENT LAWYER 09/22 #6

          https://goo.gl/EaAkZj

          It was always this B list mostly television actor who was headed to A list that had the drug issues. Big drug issues. He has recovered and he has a decent career, but not like what he had before. His celebrity girlfriend was just some pot and wine and then turned into more pot and a bottle of wine and now takes a bunch of pills for aches and pains she says she has but really doesn’t and washes it all down with a bottle or two of wine a day. Skeet Ulrich/Rose Costa

          Like

      • Why did (Insert Actor”s Name Here)”s Career Go Up In Smoke?

        https://www.datalounge.com/thread/9524363-why-did-insert-actor-s-name-here-s-career-go-up-in-smoke-

        I’m surprised many of you are befuddled by certain actors’ lack of success, but to clear a few up:

        **Skeet Ulrich – just got cast on the new “L&O: L.A.” series, so he’s basically set for life. He disappeared for a few years due to heroin addiction.

        —Anonymous

        reply 110 08/16/2010

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  2. Good article, it was a fun read for me; I remember when Skeet Ulrich was touted as “The Next Johnny Deep” (those “next” deals are rarely ever helpful or prosperous for anyone). After “Scream”, I definitely liked “Albino Alligator” and “The Newton Boys”, but after “Chill Factor” (which didn’t do the trick for me), I lost track of Ulrich for the most part. From the words he uses in his quotes here, he seems like a rather intelligent person who knows what is what. It’s too bad his career didn’t blow up like promised, but I do hope he is happy in his life, as it sounds like a true artist beats within him.

    Like

    • Top 5 Dumbest Career Choices: Skeet Ulrich Edition

      http://filmcorereviews.com/2015/09/24/top-5-dumbest-career-choices-skeet-ulrich-edition/

      Remember Skeet Ulrich? No? Of course you don’t. KNOW THIS: you could have. And that, my friends, is a terrifying, terrifying thought. When you think about skeeting now, you think about.. well… something else (don’t worry, the clip is just a very famous person talking about skeeting, not, you know, a clip of actual skeeting). Maybe, had things worked out differently for our Skeet, we would have thought of Skeeting as getting stabbed through the collarbone with an umbrella by Neve Campbell, or something. But they didn’t, and here we are.

      BUT HOW DID WE GET HERE?

      Also, while we’re talking Skeet, can you honestly tell me that you know whether it was Skeet Ulrich or Stephen Dorff getting sliced and diced by Wesley Snipes in “Blade?” You don’t, do you? (It was Dorff.) Two ridiculous names, two pale non-acting imitations of Johnny Depp. Please note — in most instances when I do these lists, it will be out of an appreciation for the movie talent in question and a desire for them to right the ship. BUT NOT THIS TIME. Without further ado, here is the Top 5 Dumbest Career Choices Listcore: Skeet Ulrich Edition.

      Agreeing to be in a film with post-1997 Tom Berenger. There was nowhere for Tom Berenger’s star to go but down after “The Substitute,” and down it plummeted. I mean, how can you beat “The Substitute?” You can’t. There is simply (ahem) no substitute for “The Substitute.” And almost immediately afterward, Berenger barely even tried, as witnessed by his sleep-walking through 2000’s Ulrich-starring “Track Down” (possibly the best title of all time this side of “Gooby”). Just to be clear, Ulrich follows up what was at least a noble stab at a big period epic, 1999’s “Riding With The Devil” from Ang Lee (the future director of “Life of Pi” and “Brokeback Mountain,” who at the time was riding high after the success of his “The Ice Storm”), with a shitty version of “Hackers” that features a 100% decrease in Angelina Jolie and a 100% increase in Donal Logue?
      Being a horrible, horrible actor who speaks in near-constant monotone with an obnoxious flat affect and apparently refusing to shave his goatee for any post-Neve Campbell role until it was too late (other than “Chill Factor”) and he had already come crawling to television. But not, you know, prestige television. More like this (yeah, they really tried to make “Law and Order: LA”). While we’re here — I am amazed that Skeet’s old co-star Terrence Howard seems to have permanently been able to duck this list. Although I have to admit I’d be the first in line for a Terryology lecture, so maybe I’m part of the problem? I dunno.

      Now granted, being a horrible actor hasn’t always impeded careers from skyrocketing (more on that guy in a future blog or podcast or list, I haven’t decided yet), but Ulrich compounded the reality of horribleness with his 3rd-biggest mistake…

      Agreeing to be in movies without reading their screenplay first, starting apparently around 1998. At least, that’s the only rational explanation for his ensuing resume I could think of. To wit: starring in “Chill Factor” (literally “Speed In An Ice Cream Truck,” albeit with Cuba Gooding Jr. as Sandra Bullock); starring in one of the biggest flops ever (in terms of sheer money lost) in “Ride With The Devil” (it cost $38 million and made… $605,000); and starring in the aforementioned post-1997 Tom Berenger film. Granted, “Ride With The Devil,” though met with yawns critically and commercially when it came out in the fall of 1999, has benefited from some revisionist appreciation, and now has its own Criterion Collection edition. Of course, “The Curious Case of Benjamin Button” is out on Criterion, too, so it’s not necessarily the be-all/end-all marker of quality. It co-starred Jewel. JEWEL. Red flag right there. It also co-starred a phenomenon I like to call Tobey Maguire When He’s Not Playing A Creep. Not to be confused with Tobey Maguire When He IS Playing A Creep. The latter Maguire typically quite top-notch, and the reason I’m so looking forward to “Pawn Sacrifice.” To wit: “Pleasantville” (that kid is pretty weird, right? I mean, you know, come on), “Fear and Loathing In Las Vegas,” fucking “Seabiscuit,” “Wonder Boys,” “The Ice Storm” all boast great Maguire performances, and he’s always approaching them strangely. I think people have forgotten that side of him.

      Ulrich’s last movie made for theaters until 2009? That would be the horrible baby-napping dramedy “Nobody’s Baby”, which is basically “Raising Arizona” if “Raising Arizona” had been written by Pauly Shore after a five-day-long meth binge. The reality of its badness actually prevented it from nabbing a theatrical release. After crashing and burning at Sundance in January of 2001, it got nary a nibble from a theatrical distributor, and instead sat on the shelf for a year and a half before an ignominious direct-to-DVD dump. This was clearly the final nail in the coffin for Skeet Ulrich-as-movie-star. He was surrounded by far superior actors left and right on this gem. Gary Oldman co-starred as Ulrich’s fellow escaped con, laying the Southerner caricaturing on really, really thick. And the producers of this fine film (there were 13, including Oldman) somehow paid Mary Steenburgen enough to play a woman who lactates whenever a baby is in the same room (this is alluded to in the trailer, but made quite explicit in the film). Sadly, “Nobody’s Baby” was so bad, however, that not even Commissioner Gordon or Clara Clayton can save it. Nor could they save their co-star from a fate worse than death: TV MOVIES BEFORE TV MOVIES WERE GOOD.

      Starring in back-to-back Neve Campbell teen-horror-comedy movies. DIVERSIFY YOUR BONDS, SON.

      Just kidding, that was actually the pinnacle of his career. The real #2? Changing his name to “Skeet Ulrich.” His birth name is Bryan Ray Trout, so, I mean, I get it. Even still, though… “Skeet Ulrich?” How much glue were you huffing when you made that decision, Bryan? You couldn’t just sit on it for a day or something? This leads us to our #1 DUMBEST CAREER CHOICE BY SKEET ULRICH.

      Are you ready?

      ARE YOU??

      Changing his name to “Skeet Ulrich.” Can’t emphasize enough how horrible a decision this was. It had to occupy two slots on this list, because, I mean, what the fuck, Skeet?

      Like

      • 10 Actors Hollywood Tried And Failed To Make Happen

        http://www.indiewire.com/2013/07/10-actors-hollywood-tried-and-failed-to-make-happen-95318/

        Skeet Ulrich
        Attempts At The Big Time: “The Craft” (1996), “Scream” (1996), “The Newton Boys” (1998), “Chill Factor” (1999), “Ride With The Devil” (1999)

        Where Did It All Go Wrong? Something of a blast from the past, but Skeet Ulrich (now principally a TV face most recently seen on “Law & Order: Los Angeles,” and featured in a pilot from “Homeland” creators Howard Gordon and Alex Gansa called “Anatomy Of Violence” that wasn’t picked up) was in many ways the Taylor Kitsch of his day. He started off as an extra before studying at NYU and landing with the Atlantic Theater Company. After a CBS special, Ulrich had a clutch of roles in 1996 that got him noticed: as Winona Ryder‘s boyfriend in “Boys,” Sharon Stone‘s brother in death row drama “Last Dance,” a role in Kevin Spacey‘s directorial debut “Albino Alligator,” and most memorably, he figured as sinister love interest in two big horror hits, “The Craft” and “Scream.”

        It was the latter in particular, where Ulrich played boyfriend/eventual killer Billy Loomis, that really got him heat, and after featuring on the famous Vanity Fair Hollywood cover of that year (albeit relegated behind the second fold with fellow never-quite Jonathan Schaech and some guy called Will Smith), landed a couple of roles the following year. First came Paul Schrader‘s undervalued “Touch,” then a smaller role in the Oscar-winning “As Good As It Gets.” These seemed to confirm Ulrich’s rising star, and he was soon stacking up leads—joining Matthew McConaughey and Ethan Hawke in Richard Linklater‘s Western “The Newton Boys,” and reteaming with Cuba Gooding Jr. for “Chill Factor.”

        Skeet Ulrich JerichoBut neither film landed: Linklater’s picture was a famous flop, and “Chill Factor” did about as well as you’d hope a movie best described as “‘Speed’ in an ice-cream van” would. There was one more big picture to come, alongside fellow rising star Tobey Maguire as the co-lead in Ang Lee‘s Civil War movie “Ride With The Devil.” Again, Ulrich is decent in the film, which is undervalued, but it failed to connect with any kind of audience after lukewarm reviews (making only $635,000 on a $40 million budget).

        Since then, Ulrich’s movie roles have been scarce (“Armored” being the most notable), but he’s carved out a fair niche for himself on TV thanks to cult show “Jericho” and his “Law & Order” stint. He was never lacking in talent, but perhaps never quite carved out his own identity (we still confuse him with Stephen Dorff, to be honest, while early on he looked almost distractingly Johnny Depp-like), and while his choices were often honorable, the films themselves never quite took hold. Still, he’s only one Sofia Coppola-advocacy away from a return to the big screen…

        Any Thoughts? Ulrich told Interview magazine back in 1996, as his movies were about to hit: “Whatever labels are being pinned on me have nothing to do with me. I think people could justify labeling me if they saw a pattern in what I do, but right now that’s impossible. As for being a magazine pinup, that’s the machine—it’s not really me. They could say I was the next Max Perlich, but it’d still be me.”

        Like

  3. I meant Johnny Depp, not Johnny Deep. Johnny Deep, HA!

    Like

  4. Skeet Ulrich talks about Riverdale, Scream, and the only time he ever got fired

    http://www.avclub.com/article/skeet-ulrich-talks-about-riverdale-scream-and-only-258027

    The actor: Skeet Ulrich may have spent years suffering the slings and arrows of critics who’ve described him as Johnny Depp Lite (not to mention far worse things), but it’s easy to endure these sorts of remarks when you’re in a bona fide box office sensation like Scream and co-starring in a film that‘s nominated for Best Picture (As Good As It Gets), even if your role does end up getting cut down dramatically. In recent years, Ulrich has spent the majority of his time on television, starring in such short-lived cult favorites as Miracles and Jericho, but he’s just been upped to series-regular status on the latest CW sensation, Riverdale. If you need a quick Ulrich fix before the show’s second season kicks off in the fall, however, he can currently be seen in the new comedy Austin Found, now in theaters and on VOD.

    Like

  5. ‘Scream’ Star Skeet Ulrich Says He “Knew” About Harvey Weinstein Claims

    http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/scream-star-skeet-ulrich-says-he-knew-harvey-weinstein-claims-1049597

    The actor, who currently stars on the CW’s ‘Riverdale,’ talks about the allegations made against the disgraced mogul, who was an executive producer on the Wes Craven horror film.
    Scream star Skeet Ulrich has opened up about the sexual misconduct allegations against Harvey Weinstein in a new interview with Cosmopolitan.

    Weinstein served as an executive producer on the 1996 Wes Craven horror film, in which Ulrich played Neve Campbell’s character’s creepy boyfriend. Ulrich can currently be seen on the CW’s Archie Comics take, Riverdale.

    Ulrich tells Cosmo when asked about Weinstein’s alleged years of sexual harassment and assault, “I knew. Most people knew. I had dinner with someone who is one of the most famous women on the planet — I won’t say who it is — who has not come out, who told me similar things.… There is nothing you can do. I mean, what am I gonna do? I can’t step up, certainly then, on allegations. Honestly, and I think it’s what most people faced: How do you cut your livelihood from a very powerful corporation on something that you don’t know what the facts are?”

    After a New York Times exposé revealed decades of alleged sexual harassment by Weinstein and more women have come forward with claims of harassment or assault, Ulrich said he’s “glad” that multiple women have shared their stories.

    “That’s what it takes,” Ulrich explained. “Because one person stepping up and making allegations is gonna hurt that one person and not help anyone, especially [against] someone with that power.”

    Rose McGowan, who also starred in Scream, has been an outspoken critic of Weinstein’s, claiming that he raped her.

    Speaking on McGowan, Ulrich said he hasn’t seen the actress recently, but finds her confession telling of the industry.

    “I saw her about a year ago, and that was the only time I’d seen her since like ’99 or something,” Ulrich said.

    “None of this [news] was out at that time, so it certainly wasn’t anything I was going to bring up with her. It wasn’t even in my thought process,” he added. “What industry is safe? Where is a beautiful woman, or any woman, free to walk down the street and not be a feast to some asshole’s eyes? I see how men can be. And then you give a man power? It’s scary.”

    Like

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