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Category Archives: Movieline Articles

Robert Evans: Staying in the Picture


Robert Evans is the legendary movie producer whose credits include Chinatown and The Godfather.  If you follow this site, I am guessing you know his story.  If not, you should pick up Evans’ autobiography, The Kid Stays in The Picture.  Or if you prefer, check out the film adaptation which Evans discussed with Movieline magazine at the time of this profile from the June 2002 issue.  Evans always has an interesting story to tell.  In the profile, Evans talks about how Jack Nicholson scammed him out of valuable furniture and the time he and Cary Grant took LSD together.

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Robert Downey Jr. : The Father of the Man


Remember when Robert Downey Jr. wasn’t a movie star?  Twenty years ago, Downey was a talented actor.  But he was also a train wreck.  He made more headlines with his substance abuse problems and subsequent legal issues than he did with his movies.  By that point in his career, Downey had been on the cusp of movie stardom for over a decade.  But it kept eluding him.

For the cover story of the June 1997 issue of Movieline magazine, Downey was interviewed by director James Toback with whom he has made The Pick-Up Artist and the soon-to-be-released Two Girls and a Guy.  Downey was very frank in discussing his career set-backs and how directos (including Toback) frustrate him.

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Mark Wahlberg: The Boogie Man


Mark Wahlberg is a movie star.  You don’t question that any more.  Next week he’s going to be headlining another Transformers movie.  Once upon a time, Wahlberg had to fight to be taken seriously as an actor.  He was still seen as Marky Mark of the Funky Bunch, rapper and underwear model.  Prior to Boogie Nights, Wahlberg had been making inroads towards respectability.  But Boogie Nights changed all that.  After his performance as Dirk Diggler, people started taking Wahlberg seriously.  In this interview from the June 1997 issue of Movieline magazine, Wahlberg talked about his burgeoning movie career.

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Sigourney Weaver: The Heat is On


Sigourney Weaver is a genre icon.  It’s probably a safe bet that she is best known for having played Ellen Ripley in four Alien movies with the threat of a fifth installment to be made some day if the stars align.  Despite a strong connection with science fiction, Weaver’s career has been fairly eclectic.  She’s done comedies ranging from Ghostbusters to Working Girl and prestige pictures like Gorillas in the Mist.  And she’s been nominated for Oscars in all of these different kinds of roles.

In 1992, Weaver was returning to the part of Ripley for what was supposed to be the last time in Alien3.  She was coming off a hiatus during which she gave birth to her only child.  In this cover story from the June 1992 issue of Movieline magazine, Weaver discussed her changing priorities as an actress and a mother.

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Lost in the Looking Glass


In the June 2002 issue of Movieline magazine, F.X. Feeney examined the ways in which Hollywood portrays the dangers of show business in movies about Hollywood.

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Faye Dunaway: Through The Eyes Of Faye Dunaway


What’s the first thing that comes to mind when you think of Faye Dunaway?  Odds are, it’s Mommie Dearest and “no wire hangers”.  Here at Le Blog where we have a long-running series detailing the career embarrassments of the Golden Raspberry Awards (at which Dunaway was a regular nominee), we tend to focus on that sort of thing.

Dunaway’s fall from grace was sharp and memorable because at one point, she was one of the top actresses in Hollywood.  Stephen Rebello, who interviewed the actress for the June 2002 issue of Movieline magazine, mainly sticks to the highlights of Dunaway’s career while getting gabby about her famous costars.

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Eric Stoltz: True Confessions of a Faux Paraplegic


I’m trying to think, what would modern audiences know Eric Stoltz from?  He’s shown up in some TV shows.  If you’re a sci-fi fan, you may remember Stoltz from the Battlestar Galactica spin-off, Caprica.  The first thing that comes to my mind is his supporting role from Pulp Fiction, but that goes back over two decades.  The trivia obsessed will remember that Stoltz was fired from Back to the Future.  But despite lead roles in movies like Mask and Some Kind of Wonderful, Stoltz never really caught on with the main stream.

Instead, Stoltz gravitated towards the indie scene of the 1990’s.  In this interview from the June 1992 issue of Movieline magazine, Stoltz discusses his acting technique as well as his recently rekindled relationship with Bridget Fonda.

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Phillip Noyce: Have You Directed a Ford Lately?


In 1990, Alec Baldwin originated the character of Jack Ryan in the hit thriller, The Hunt For Red October.  Paramount was eager to continue the series based on Tom Clancy’s novels.  But they were less enthusiastic over the prospects of working with Baldwin.  When the actor played hardball with the studio, Paramount was all too happy to replace Baldwin with a bigger star in Harrison Ford.  Clancy was a vocal critic of the casting, but Aussie director Phillip Noyce (who would go on to direct Ford again in Clear and Present Danger) had nothing but praise for his Patriot Games star in this interview from the June 1992 issue of Movieline magazine.

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Heather Graham: Come Heather


 

As a child actor in the 80’s, Heather Graham faced a unique career challenge in that her strict parents would not let her take parts in movies they found offensive.  In the 90’s, fully grown and freed from her parents’ restrictions, Graham enjoyed a measure of success as a leading lady.  This profile from the May 1997 issue of Movieline magazine sees Graham on her way up with a supporting role in Paul Thomas Anderson’s Boogie Nights.

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Morgan Freeman: The Latecomer


I remember watching Morgan Freeman as Easy Reader on The Electric Company as a kid.  Like most people, I had no idea who he was.  Freeman spent decades trying to make a name for himself as an actor.  His efforts finally paid off in 1987 with the one-two punch of Street Smarts and the stage version of Driving Miss Daisy.  For the next decade, Freeman slowly built up his resume until he became Hollywood’s go-to guy for mentor characters.  In this interview from the May 1997 issue of Movieline magazine, Freeman describes his struggles and the attitude that got him through the lean years.

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Al Pacino: An Evening With Al


Imagine that you are an English major learning how to conduct an interview.  Your teacher arranges for a guest to come to class to answer a few questions.  And that guest just happens to be Oscar winning actor, Al Pacino.  For a handful of students at UCLA, that actually happened.  Writer Lawrence Grobel convinced Pacino to answer a few questions for his students and this article from the May 2002 issue of Movieline magazine was the result.

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For The Funny Of It


Michael Rosenbaum recently showed up in a cameo role in the sequel to Guardians of the Galaxy.  You may not have recognized him since his face was covered in CGI effects.  Rosenbaum is best known for playing Lex Luthor on the long running TV show, Smallville.  While that show was still on the air, the actor made a small bid for movie roles as in the comedy Sorority Boys.  The May 2002 issue of Movieline magazine included a profile of Rosenbaum and fellow handsome comedic actor, David Sheridan.

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Neil LaBute: Turning to Love


You don’t hear much from writer-director Neil LaBute anymore.  In the late 90’s, the playwright became an indie sensation by adapting his play In the Company of Men into a movie.  He followed that movie up with the equally buzzy Your Friends & Neighbors and went slightly mainstream with the comedy Nurse Betty.  But LaBute’s upward trajectory didn’t continue.  In 2006, he would hit the skids with the infamous remake of The Wicker Man.  In between his early career highs and eventual lows, LaBute made the 2002 drama Possession starring Gwyneth Paltrow and Aaron Eckhart.  Stephen Rebello interviewed the director for the May 2002 issue of Movieline magazine.

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