Category Archives: Movies

Jennifer Tilly Unbound


Tilly - bound

If you know Jennifer Tilly, you probably have a very specific idea of who she is based on the types of character she is known for playing.  Tilly has played more than her share of helium voiced dingbats.  But it turns out the Oscar-nominated actress is very different from her screen personae.  I guess that’s why they call it acting, huh?  In the August 1986 issue of Movieline, Tilly talked about her upcoming film noir in which she and Gina Gershon played lesbians who try to steal from the mob.  She also explains why she would rather watch the Oscars from home than actually be there.

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Bad Movies We Love About Marilyn Monroe


Tommy

If you like bad movies and Marilyn Monroe, you will probably like these six bad movies about the iconic actress.  Edward Margulies explored the cinema of Marilyn in the August 1991 issue of Movieline magazine.

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Starlog Archives: Star Trek Past, Present and Future


The first issue of Starlog magazine was published in August of 1976.  It was started by high school pals, Kerry O’Quinn and David Houston.  They had kicked around the idea of a publication that would cover sci-fi movies and TV shows.  Originally, O’Quinn pitched the idea of a one-time special that would deal exclusively with Star Trek.   They contacted Trek creator Gene Roddenberry who agreed to be interviewed for the magazine.  With Roddenberry’s blessing, the founders thought they were clear to proceed.  But when Paramount caught wind of the project, they asked for royalty fees that exceeded the magazine’s profits.  After shelving the project, O’Quinn revisited the idea of a quarterly magazine that would cover all of science fiction (with a heavy emphasis on Star Trek).

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Billy Baldwin: William Tells


Baldwin - Fair Game

In the nineties, there were so many Baldwins it was hard to keep them straight.  Since then, the oldest one has continued to work primarily in television, the youngest became a minister and a fixture on reality TV, and the middle two brothers kind of disappeared.  Billy Baldwin had a pretty good run through the first half of the decade.  In the August 1995 issue of Movieline, Dennis Hensley asked him about filming sex scenes with a super model, proposing to one third of Wilson Phillips and knocking his mother’s teeth out.

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Summer Movie Survey 2016


Summer Movies 2016

Another summer movie season has come and gone.  Next week, Daffy and I will have a recap of what we saw and what we thought.  But I wanted to give you readers a chance to have your say.  After the jump, there is a survey consisting of 30 of the biggest summer releases.  For each one, let us know if you gave it or thumbs up or a thumbs down or if you just didn’t see it.  Next Sunday we’ll include your responses in our summer movie round-up.  (Don’t worry if you haven’t seen most of them.  I doubt many readers have.)

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Building my Movie Posters Puzzle: Frankenstein


Screen Shot 2016-08-19 at 12.13.25 PM

In late June I took advantage of some free days to visit my Mother in Virginia for her birthday. It was a fun long weekend that included meals out, a screening of Finding Dory, and an unexpected shared activity when I ran across a puzzle in the book store that was just too good to pass up. It consists of thirty-nine posters from a wide variety of classic films stretching from the silent era of the 1920s into the 1970s. It was an engrossing project to undertake alongside my Mother and we naturally discussed several of the featured movies as we built it. What stunned me a little was that I had actually only seen twenty-six of the thirty-nine films honored. I have vowed to fill these gaps in my knowledge of film and take you along for the ride as I reconstruct the puzzle in question. I’ll re-watch the movies I’ve already seen along with experiencing the ones that are new to me and share my thoughts on each one.

Director James Whale’s 1931 production of Frankenstein continues to be one of the most iconic films in the history of cinema and helped to bring Mary Shelly’s creation to the masses in unexpected and perhaps unfortunate ways.The image of the creature animated by Dr. Frankenstein and portrayed by actor Boris Karloff was as famous as Mickey Mouse or Bugs Bunny more than forty years after the film’s release when I was growing up in the early 1970s. It might have receded a bit in recent years, but is still quite well known. The Whale film that kicked of the mania has its strengths and weaknesses. Let’s discuss.
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Movieline Cover Gallery 1990

Blarney Stoned


Darby O'Gill and the Little People

In the August 1996 issue of Movieline magazine, Irish-American columnist Joe Queenan examined the way the Irish have been depicted in movies.  He ranks movies based on the number of cliches they can lay claim to and crowns a then-recent indie movie as the King of Blarney.

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Edward Burns: He’s the One


She's the One

Edward Burns worked as a gofer on “Entertainment Tonight” for four years.  Then his directorial debut, The Brothers McMullenbecame an indie sensation at the Sundance Film Festival and Burns became Hollywood’s latest hot director.  In the August 1996 issue of Movieline magazine, Danny Peary caught up with Burns as he was working on his follow-up, She’s the One.

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Starlog Archive: Independence Day


Earlier this summer, Independence Day: Resurgence was one of many disappointing sequels.  Many were scratching their heads wondering why anyone would make a sequel to a movie that was twenty years old and way past its pop culture expiration date.  The reason was simple.  The first Independence Day was the highest-grossing movie of 1996.  It was so big that Time Magazine credited the movie with reviving science fiction!  So naturally, Starlog was pretty excited about the alien invasion/disaster flick.

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What the Hell Happened to Kelly McGillis?


Kelly McGillis

Kelly McGillis

In the mid-eighties, Kelly McGillis was a rising star.  Early in her career, she had a couple of hits one of which turned out to be one of the most iconic movies of the entire decade.  Top Gun made Tom Cruise a mega-star.  But McGillis’ career went in a different direction.  A few years after her star-making role, McGillis became dissatisfied with Hollywood.  While McGillis has continued working steadily. she has largely avoided the spotlight.

What the hell happened?

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Bruce Willis: Planet Willis


Willis - Last Man Standing

One of the things that stood out about Movieline magazine was that they didn’t pull their punches in interviews.  The writers asked their subjects the kind of direct questions you didn’t see that often in other entertainment magazines.  This was true even when the subject was known for being difficult.  If anything, the questions were even more direct with a difficult subject.  That was the case when Martha Frankel interviewed a very defensive Bruce Willis for the cover story of the August 1996 issue.

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Building my Movie Posters Puzzle: Pillow Talk


Screen Shot 2016-08-12 at 10.00.21 PM

In late June I took advantage of some free days to visit my Mother in Virginia for her birthday. It was a fun long weekend that included meals out, a screening of Finding Dory, and an unexpected shared activity when I ran across a puzzle in the book store that was just too good to pass up. It consists of thirty-nine posters from a wide variety of classic films stretching from the silent era of the 1920s into the 1970s. It was an engrossing project to undertake alongside my Mother and we naturally discussed several of the featured movies as we built it. What stunned me a little was that I had actually only seen twenty-six of the thirty-nine films honored. I have vowed to fill these gaps in my knowledge of film and take you along for the ride as I reconstruct the puzzle in question. I’ll re-watch the movies I’ve already seen along with experiencing the ones that are new to me and share my thoughts on each one.

Despite its frothy reputation, there’s a reason that Pillow Talk, starring Rock Hudson and Doris Day, was both hugely successful at the box office and the recipient of some awards season love. That reason was rather accurately identified by the Academy when they awarded the film with 1959’s Oscar for Original Screenplay. The admittedly antiquated storyline and plot devices are clever nonetheless, and the dialogue is straight out smart and funny. For example, in response to Hudson’s character thinking her new beau’s intentions are not necessarily honorable, Day retorts “Not all men finish every sentence with a proposition.”
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