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The Six-Million Dollar Men


Pretend you are a high powered Hollywood producer.  The year is 1992 – a time when movie stars mattered.  If you wanted to open a hit movie, you needed an A-list leading man.  In order to attract top-tier talent, deals were being struck that included ever-increasing pay days for a select group of movie stars.  In the July 1992 issue of Movieline magazine, they looked at who was earning six million dollars or more per picture and asked, are they worth it?  Some of these guys may have been.  Some, in retrospect, definitely weren’t .  With the benefit of a quarter century of hindsight, let’s sort out who belongs in which group.

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July 6: Happy Birthday Geoffrey Rush and Janet Leigh


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Geoffrey Rush is turning 66 today.  A winner of the unofficial Triple Crown of Acting, he began his acting career with the Queensland Theatre Company in Brisbane, Australia, in the early 1970s.  For over twenty years he appears to have worked primarily in Australian theater; details are a bit hard to come by although.  He appeared in a 1979 production of Waiting for Godot, where one of his costars was a young actor named Mel Gibson.  Rush has continued to work periodically on stage throughout his career, winning a Tony for Best Actor in a Play for a 2009 revival of Eugene Ionesco’s Exit the King.

Rush made a few appearances in Australian film and television beginning in the late seventies, but no one could have expected the outcome when he was cast as the Australian pianist David Helfgott in the biopic Shine (Rush played Helfgott as an adult, while the younger Helfgott was played by Alex Rafalowicz and Noah Taylor).  Rush won the Oscar for Best Actor and swept the other main Best Actor honors.

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Movieline Cover Gallery 1995

Golden Raspberry Awards: 2015


Razzies 2015

The Golden Raspberries started off as an informal joke.  Something for a publicist and his friends to do after the Oscars had ended.  Over time, it has become and enduring and irreverent tradition.  In theory, The Razzies poke fun at the worst movies of the year.  But like any awards ceremony, the Razzies frequently make the wrong call.  We’re going back and looking at the history of the Golden Raspberry Awards one year at a time.

The thirty-sixth annual Razzies nominated the movies of 2015.   Star Wars: The Force Awakens and Jurassic World were the top movies of the year. Spotlight was named Best Picture and Alejandro G. Iñárritu won his second consecutive Best Director prize for The Revenant.  That movie’s star, Leonardo DiCaprio, finally won Best Actor and Brie Larson was named Best Actress.  The Razzies got all hot and bothered over bondage and less-than-fantastic super hero teams.

Also, the Razzies sort of apologized to their biggest target.

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What if the LeBlog Readers Ran the Academy Awards?


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Do you sometimes wish you lived in one of those ‘parallel universes’ or ‘alternate realities’ science fiction stories are so fond of dreaming up? You know, the kind where the whims of you and your friends would just fall into place and where your own tastes were pretty much accepted as common knowledge. Well, we’re going to give you just a little taste of what such a place would be like today. In this scenario, we plunge into the heart of a black hole and come out on the other end in a universe in which LeBlog readers are the arbiters of all pop culture taste. So much so, in fact, that when it’s time to give out the yearly awards in film (affectionately nicknamed “the Lebeaus”) it is only the members of the Academy of our readership who get a vote on the major categories. The golden statuette is a reference to two of our favorite genre pictures, Star Wars and Goldfinger. It carries a sword to deal with any smart guys who find it necessary to point out that the history of these awards goes back thirty-five years prior to either of those movies.

Today we will discover how such a world would be different from our own in respects to the film awards that were given out just this past weekend in our own tawdry original timeline. How do we know such a thing? Well, thankfully we’ve been collecting data from our readers over the last couple of weeks for just such an occasion. Obviously, from the top image you can tell that our wise readers have selected George Miller’s thrilling action sequel Mad Max: Fury Road as Best Picture of the year. The decision was not unanimous, with Earth 616’s eventual winner Spotlight posting a strong second place showing. In the end, however, brilliant production design and water tight staging of action sequences won the Lebeau for Miller and company.

Would you like to see the rest of this parallel universe? Just click below and enter a most glorious place and time.
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An Oscars Conversation with Lebeau and Daffystardust


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Greetings lovely LeBlog readers! As a part of our Oscars coverage this year Lebeau and I decided to try a little conversation on the topic via traded typing. We’ll be discussing our personal favorite nominees, the current controversies surrounding the awards, our expectations of the televised event, and whatever else might just pop into our heads. I’m your Oscars coverage manager Daffystardust and obviously I’m an Oscars enthusiast. Lebeau is less so, but hey, his name’s on the joint so he’s gonna get his say. Hey there Lebeau! What stands out for you about this year’s nominated films and performances?
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Golden Raspberry Awards: Worst of the Decade – 1990’s


Razzies 1990s

The Golden Raspberries started off as an informal joke.  Something for a publicist and his friends to do after the Oscars had ended.  Over time, it has become and enduring and irreverent tradition.  In theory, The Razzies poke fun at the worst movies of the year.  But like any awards ceremony, the Razzies frequently make the wrong call.  We’re going back and looking at the history of the Golden Raspberry Awards one year at a time.

As part of the twentieth annual ceremony, the Razzies got retrospective.  They came up with two special awards to honor the worst of the 1990’s and two additional awards looking back at the twentieth century – or at least the two decades of the twentieth century covered by the Golden Raspberries.  In essence, this was one final chance for the Razzies to hit their favorite targets one more time.

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This Year’s Supporting Actor Nominees


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This is quite often my favorite category of the night come Oscars time. These are the guys who give color and interest to a film and leave a real impression with only limited screen time. Although there have certainly been some actors who are usually thought of as leading men who ended up landing in this category, what we’ve normally got are more eccentric or edgy types. This is where you find villains like Christoph Waltz’s Hans Landa of Inglorious Basterds or Ed Begley’s “Boss” Finley in Sweet Bird of Youth. It’s where you’ll see more comedic performances honored than anywhere else, like Jack Lemmon as Ensign Pulver in Mister Roberts or Kevin Kline as Otto in A Fish Called Wanda. Sometimes when you think of the movie your mind first grabs an image of this guy, like with last year’s winner for Whiplash, J.K. Simmons or John Houseman in The Paper Chase. This category brings us men who are dangerous with their gun (Joe Pesci in Goodfellas) or with their tongue (George Sanders in All About Eve). This is where legends like Sean Connery, Christopher Walken, John Gielgud, and Michael Caine picked up their golden statuettes.

It can also be a dauntingly competitive category. In 2012 Waltz had to beat out Alan Arkin, Philip Seymour Hoffman, Tommy Lee Jones, and Robert DeNiro. James Coburn earned a late career Oscar when sharing this category with Robert DuVall, Ed Harris, and Geoffrey Rush. I remember being very conflicted in 1994 when I realized Samuel L Jackson (Pulp Fiction), Gary Sinese (Forrest Gump) and Martin Landau (Ed Wood) could only produce one Oscar among them.

The same is true of this year’s group, even if they’re not quite as impressive as those mentioned above.

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Golden Raspberry Awards: 1994


Razzie 1994

The Golden Raspberries started off as an informal joke.  Something for a publicist and his friends to do after the Oscars had ended.  Over time, it has become and enduring and irreverent tradition.  In theory, The Razzies poke fun at the worst movies of the year.  But like any awards ceremony, the Razzies frequently make the wrong call.  We’re going back and looking at the history of the Golden Raspberry Awards one year at a time.

The fifteenth annual Razzies nominated the movies of 1994.  The Lion King and Forrest Gump were the highest-grossing movies that year.  David Letterman introduced Oprah Winfrey to Uma Thurman at the Oscars which was a showdown between Gump and Pulp.  Tom Hanks won his second consecutive Best Actor Oscar which set the tone for a Forrest Gump sweep.  The Razzies introduced a couple of new categories which allowed them to spread the love around.

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The Golden Raspberry Award 2015 Nominees


Golden Raspberry Award

For the last few months, I have been recapping the Golden Raspberry Awards one year at a time.  I will continue my in depth analysis through the present day as the series progresses.  But for now, here are the 2015 Golden Raspberry Award Nominees.  Feel free to discuss at lengths in the comments section.

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Golden Raspberry Awards: 1992


Razzies 1992

The Golden Raspberries started off as an informal joke.  Something for a publicist and his friends to do after the Oscars had ended.  Over time, it has become and enduring and irreverent tradition.  In theory, The Razzies poke fun at the worst movies of the year.  But like any awards ceremony, the Razzies frequently make the wrong call.  We’re going back and looking at the history of the Golden Raspberry Awards one year at a time.

The thirteenth annual Razzies nominated the movies of 1992.  Aladdin and The Bodyguard were the highest-grossing movies that year. Unforgiven took home a lot of big prizes at the Oscars and Al Pacino finally won Best Actor.  Unfortunately it was for Scent of a Woman.   A weird thing happened at the Razzies.  Despite leading the pack with seven nominations, The Bodyguard didn’t win a single award.

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Golden Raspberry Awards: Worst of the Decade – 1980’s


Razzies 1980s

The Golden Raspberries started off as an informal joke.  Something for a publicist and his friends to do after the Oscars had ended.  Over time, it has become and enduring and irreverent tradition.  In theory, The Razzies poke fun at the worst movies of the year.  But like any awards ceremony, the Razzies frequently make the wrong call.  We’re going back and looking at the history of the Golden Raspberry Awards one year at a time.

As part of the tenth annual ceremony, the Razzies served up four special awards to honor what they considered to be the worst offerings of the decade.  Over the first ten years of the Razzies, there were certain names that kept popping up on a regular basis.  If you have been reading along so far, you can expect to see a lot of familiar faces here.

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Review: Creed


Stallone - Creed

No, despite its name, Creed is not a movie about a rock band that ripped off Pearl Jam, fell apart and had its former lead singer descend into mental illness.

But it can take you higher.

Creed is less a Rocky sequel than a spin-off. It isn’t as much about rebooting the Italian Stallion as it is pointing the series in a fresh direction.

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