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Vince Vaughn: It’s Oz, Bro


Post-Swingers, Vince Vaughn was a hot commodity in Hollywood.  But for a while, it seemed like no one knew what to do with the fast-talking actor.  This interview from the September 1997 issue of Movieline magazine comes after Vaughn broke out with Swingers.  He had a supporting role in Lost World under his belt an lots of indies on the horizon.  But at the time, Vaughn was just happy to be there.

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Out of Nowhere: Vince Vaughn in Swingers


It may be hard to remember, but there was a time when Vince Vaughn was a hungry actor.  Back when he made a star-turn in the indie comedy, Swinger, Vaughn was physically lean and his performance was energetic.  Since then, Vaughn appears to have grown increasingly complacent on screen.  In this interview from the March 1997 issue of Movieline, Vaughn was still an up-and-comer with the world at his feet.

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March 28: Happy Birthday Reba McEntire and Lady Gaga


0328McentireGaga

Our recent abundance of musical birthdays continues today.  Our headliners today are known, respectively, as the Queen of Country and the Princess of Pop (although neither is the sole claimant to her title).

Reba McEntire celebrates her 62nd birthday today.  She was studying to be a teacher at Southeastern Oklahoma State University when country singer Rod Steagall heard her sing the national anthem at a rodeo competition, and helped her land a recording contract with Mercury.  Her first album came out in 1977, but she didn’t begin to be a major success until the early 1980s.  Her fifth album, Unlimited, resulted in her first two #1 Country singles, but she soon moved to MCA in order to have more creative control over her recordings.  In 1986 Whoever’s in New England became her first #1 Country album, while the title song won her her first Grammy.

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Movies of 1996 Bracket Game: Swingers Vs. Trainspotting


Swingers Vs Trainspotting

We’re down to the final match of the first round of our 1996 bracket game.  It started off with the two biggest movies of the year and now it’s down to two of the year’s low-budget indie comedies.  In the past, I have defended the nineties as a good decade for movies.  But if I were basing my opinion of the decade on 1996, I’d probably feel otherwise.  As a whole, 1996 was an off year.  But one of the things that made the 90’s so good overall was the independent film movement in general and Miramax in particular.  The folks at Miramax proved to be skilled at finding little arthouse movies that didn’t costs tens of millions of dollars and marketing them to mainstream audiences.  Over the course of the decade, other studios wanted a piece of that action making the nineties an excellent time for lovers of eccentric comedies.

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Review: Unfinished Business


I picked up  “Unfinished Business” on a whim at Redbox, based on the trailer.  High art this isn’t, and it was pretty universally scorned by critics, yet there are some interesting things happening within the project as a whole that kept it mostly watchable.

Vince Vaughn plays Dan Trunkman, who works for a corporate ice queen, oddly named Chuck, and played by Sienna Miller.  Dan arrives at work one day to find she has reduced his commission for his latest deal, and the confrontation becomes personal. And in some ways, unrealistic as most managers aren’t going to tell someone to their face that they’re replaceable, in front of a roomful of people.  Yet because of how stuff happens in workplaces in a less overt manner, what the scene portrays will still resonate with a lot of people.

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